Take the 2-minute tour ×
TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm about to start writing something up which includes a fair number of Dynkin diagrams, and I can think of several ways of going about it:

  • Just draw the darn things in, e.g., InkScape, and include the graphics in the standard way.

  • Hack them together using the picture environment or tikz, as this person suggests.

  • Abuse the feynmf package, possibly with defining new kinds of "propagator" lines.

Anybody have experience with this sort of task?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I would not recommend abusing the feynmf package. In the past I have used the picture environment (with the eepic package) to do precisely this.

Table 6.2 in page 185 of these lecture notes (PDF file), I typeset the Dynkin diagrams using the picture environment. I'm happy to make the code available. Here's a sample for the $A_n$ Dynkin diagram:

\begin{picture}(50,7)
\multiput(5,1)(10,0){5}{\circle{2}}
\multiputlist(10,1)(10,0)%
{{\line(1,0){8}},{\line(1,0){8}},{$\cdots$},{\line(1,0){8}}}
\multiputlist(5,3)(10,0){$\scriptscriptstyle 1$,%
$\scriptscriptstyle 2$,$\scriptscriptstyle 3$,%
$\scriptscriptstyle \ell{-}1$,$\scriptscriptstyle \ell$}
\end{picture}

The diagram is decorated with a labelling of the nodes, by the way.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, this only uses the epic package, not the eepic package. –  José Figueroa-O'Farrill Jul 27 '10 at 18:55

Using the Tikz package, I wrote this up for a paper. It gives the classification of the compact Hermitian symmetric spaces, in terms of marked Dynkin diagrams. enter image description here

\documentclass{standalone}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{amsfonts}
\usepackage{array}
\usepackage{tikz}
\usetikzlibrary{decorations.markings}

\newcommand{\C}[1]{\mathbb{C}^{#1}}

\newcommand{\dynkinradius}{.04cm}
\newcommand{\dynkinstep}{.35cm}
\newcommand{\dynkindot}[2]{\fill (\dynkinstep*#1,\dynkinstep*#2) circle (\dynkinradius);}
\newcommand{\dynkinXsize}{1.5}
\newcommand{\dynkincross}[2]{
\draw[thick] (#1*\dynkinstep-\dynkinXsize,#2*\dynkinstep-\dynkinXsize) -- (#1*\dynkinstep+\dynkinXsize,#2*\dynkinstep+\dynkinXsize);
\draw[thick] (#1*\dynkinstep-\dynkinXsize,#2*\dynkinstep+\dynkinXsize) -- (#1*\dynkinstep+\dynkinXsize,#2*\dynkinstep-\dynkinXsize);
}
\newcommand{\dynkinline}[4]{\draw[thin] (\dynkinstep*#1,\dynkinstep*#2) -- (\dynkinstep*#3,\dynkinstep*#4);}
\newcommand{\dynkindots}[4]{\draw[dotted] (\dynkinstep*#1,\dynkinstep*#2) -- (\dynkinstep*#3,\dynkinstep*#4);}
\newcommand{\dynkindoubleline}[4]{\draw[double,postaction={decorate}] (\dynkinstep*#1,\dynkinstep*#2) -- (\dynkinstep*#3,\dynkinstep*#4);}

\newenvironment{dynkin}{\begin{tikzpicture}[decoration={markings,mark=at position 0.7 with {\arrow{>}}}]}
{\end{tikzpicture}}

\begin{document}
\renewcommand*{\arraystretch}{1.5}
\begin{tabular}{>{$}r<{$}m{2cm}m{8cm}}
A_n &
  \begin{dynkin}
    \dynkinline{1}{0}{2}{0};
    \dynkindots{2}{0}{3}{0};
    \dynkinline{3}{0}{5}{0};
    \dynkindots{5}{0}{6}{0};
    \dynkinline{6}{0}{7}{0};
    \foreach \x in {1,...,7}
    {
       \ifnum \x=4 {\dynkincross{\x}{0}}
       \else {\dynkindot{\x}{0}}
       \fi
    }
  \end{dynkin}
&
Grassmannian of $k$-planes in $\C{n+1}$ \\
B_n &
  \begin{dynkin}
    \dynkinline{1}{0}{2}{0};
    \dynkindots{2}{0}{3}{0};
    \dynkinline{3}{0}{4}{0};
    \dynkindoubleline{4}{0}{5}{0};
    \dynkincross{1}{0};
    \foreach \x in {2,...,5}
    {
        \dynkindot{\x}{0}
    }
  \end{dynkin}
& 
$(2n-1)$-dimensional hyperquadric, i.e. the variety of null lines in $\C{2n+1}$
\\
C_n 
&
  \begin{dynkin}
    \dynkinline{1}{0}{2}{0};
    \dynkindots{2}{0}{3}{0};
    \dynkinline{3}{0}{4}{0};
    \dynkindoubleline{5}{0}{4}{0};
    \dynkincross{5}{0};
    \foreach \x in {1,...,4}
    {
        \dynkindot{\x}{0}
    }
  \end{dynkin}
& 
space of Lagrangian $n$-planes in $\C{2n}$
\\
D_n
&
  \begin{dynkin}
    \foreach \x in {2,...,4}
    {
        \dynkindot{\x}{0}
    }
    \dynkindot{4.5}{.9}
    \dynkindot{4.5}{-.9}
    \dynkincross{1}{0}
    \dynkinline{1}{0}{2}{0}
    \dynkindots{2}{0}{3}{0}
    \dynkinline{3}{0}{4}{0}
    \dynkinline{4}{0}{4.5}{.9}
    \dynkinline{4}{0}{4.5}{-.9}
  \end{dynkin}
& $(2n-1)$-dimensional hyperquadric, i.e. the variety of null lines in $\C{2n+1}$
\\
D_n
&
  \begin{dynkin}
    \foreach \x in {1,...,4}
    {
        \dynkindot{\x}{0}
    }
    \dynkincross{4.5}{.9}
    \dynkindot{4.5}{-.9}
    \dynkinline{1}{0}{2}{0}
    \dynkindots{2}{0}{3}{0}
    \dynkinline{3}{0}{4}{0}
    \dynkinline{4}{0}{4.5}{.9}
    \dynkinline{4}{0}{4.5}{-.9}
  \end{dynkin}
&
one component of the variety of maximal dimension null subspaces of $\C{2n}$
\\
D_n
&
  \begin{dynkin}
    \foreach \x in {1,...,4}
    {
        \dynkindot{\x}{0}
    }
    \dynkincross{4.5}{-.9}
    \dynkindot{4.5}{.9}
    \dynkinline{1}{0}{2}{0}
    \dynkindots{2}{0}{3}{0}
    \dynkinline{3}{0}{4}{0}
    \dynkinline{4}{0}{4.5}{.9}
    \dynkinline{4}{0}{4.5}{-.9}
  \end{dynkin}
&
the other component
\\
E_6 
&
  \begin{dynkin}
    \foreach \x in {2,...,5}
    {
        \dynkindot{\x}{0}
    }
    \dynkincross{1}{0}
    \dynkindot{3}{1}
    \dynkinline{1}{0}{5}{0}
    \dynkinline{3}{0}{3}{1}
  \end{dynkin}
&
complexified octave projective plane
\\
E_6 
&
  \begin{dynkin}
    \foreach \x in {1,...,4}
    {
        \dynkindot{\x}{0}
    }
    \dynkincross{5}{0}
    \dynkindot{3}{1}
    \dynkinline{1}{0}{5}{0}
    \dynkinline{3}{0}{3}{1}
  \end{dynkin}
&
its dual plane
\\
E_7
&
  \begin{dynkin}
    \foreach \x in {1,...,5}
    {
        \dynkindot{\x}{0}
    }
    \dynkincross{6}{0}
    \dynkindot{3}{1}
    \dynkinline{1}{0}{6}{0}
    \dynkinline{3}{0}{3}{1}
  \end{dynkin}
&
the space of null octave 3-planes in octave 6-space
\end{tabular}
\end{document}
share|improve this answer

I typically use tikz. I like tikz because I find it relatively straight-forward. Also, because my interest is in representation theory and quivers I have to create many other diagrams beyond Dynkin diagrams and tikz allows me to use a single language to create all of them and the resulting graphics have a consistent style (arrow heads, line thickness, etc).

share|improve this answer
    
I like tikz a lot, too. There's a great site that has a lot of examples, though no Dynkin Diagrams (yet!): texample.net/tikz/examples –  Suppressingfire Jul 27 '10 at 20:56

I have two additional suggestions:

  • Use the Xy-pic package. I find easier than tikz or feynmf.
  • Or you can find a paper on the arxiv which has some Dynkin diagrams and see what the authors have done.
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.