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I am trying to write my 'Matura work' for school in LaTeX. Therefore I am using MacTeX and Texshop and normally it works pretty fine.

But at the moment I have some trouble with a glossary entry:

\newglossaryentry{gloss:iosgerät}{name={\emph{iOS-Gerät}},description={iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad und Apple TV werden mit iOS betrieben. In dieser Arbeit wird Apple TV jedoch nicht gemeint, wenn von iOS-Geräten die Rede ist.}}

Picture of console-output:

http://db.tt/LmapdUYH

Some days ago I read that Xindy can help to fix issues like this but I have no Idea how to use Xindy instead of MakeIndex.

I should have a engine like this:

#!/bin/sh
bfname=$(dirname "$1")/"`basename "$1" .tex`"
makeindex -s "$bfname".ist -t "$bfname".alg -o "$bfname".acr "$bfname".acn
makeindex -s "$bfname".ist -o "$bfname".gls -t "$bfname".glg "$bfname".glo

Please help me.

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1 Answer

The first argument of \newglossaryentry is just a symbolic name; in these, as in the argument to \label, no accented letter should be used.

Use

\newglossaryentry{gloss:iosgerat}{
  name={\emph{iOS-Gerät}},
  description={iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad und Apple TV werden
               mit iOS betrieben. In dieser Arbeit wird Apple
               TV jedoch nicht gemeint, wenn von iOS-Geräten
               die Rede ist.}
}

That key will never appear in your document and is used only for internal references.

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I think name=\emph{iOS-Gerät} should be avoided because glossaries has keys to format the name. –  Marco Daniel Jan 15 '12 at 9:11
1  
It'd be customary in German to replace the umlaut <ä> by <ae>. Counterintuitive as it may be, the dots of an umlaut can't really be considered accents and hence just left out; <ä>, <ö> and <ü> pretty much are letters of their own. (Just like a sharp s <ß> usually would be replaced by a double s when not available, not by a single s.) –  doncherry Jan 15 '12 at 12:07
    
@doncherry It was just to remark that the key is an arbitrary string of (7 bit, printable) ASCII characters; one can choose whatever string is deemed memorizable. –  egreg Jan 15 '12 at 13:34
    
@egreg: Yes, I just thought I'd share the extra information. It was on my mind because I'm contemplating whether an umlaut tag would make sense. –  doncherry Jan 15 '12 at 13:59
    
Thanks... Now this entry appears in my glossary :D –  Robin de Bois Jan 16 '12 at 15:03
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