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Let's say I have a text block like this:

Within the field of texture analysis, a number of categories of methods exist, and even if we restrict ourselves to statistical methods, a large number of methods are available. \begin{equation} f(x) = x + 3 \end{equation} Statistical approaches are considered to be generally applicable and work well for natural textures present in images.

Here the \begin{equation} f(x) = x + 3 \end{equation} won't work. Could someone please help me?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Use dollar symbols:

...a large number of methods are available. $f(x) = x + 3$ Statistical 
approaches are considered to be...

Note that equations should be part of a sentence. Also, you might like to read the Not So Short Introcution to LaTeX2e.

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While dollar signs work, it's better to use \( and \):

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
Within the field of texture analysis, a number of categories of methods exist, and even
if we restrict ourselves to statistical methods, a large number of methods are
available. \( f(x) = x + 3 \) Statistical approaches are considered to be generally
applicable and work well for natural textures present in images.
\end{document}

For the reasoning behind that and more information, see Are \( and \) preferable to $?. In this thread, Will Robertson suggests that you should only use this syntax in combination with the fixltx2e package.

Furthermore, I agree with Ian: In-line equations should be properly embedded in the sentence structure.

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