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I am using TeXLive 2011 on Linux with a font called sasmono. When I compile my LaTeX source with xelatex, it reports

 (./myoutput.lst
Missing character: There is no ^^83 in font [/u/tiarno/tests/sasmono/sasmono.tt
f]/ICU:!

My LaTeX source:

\documentclass{book}
\usepackage{fontspec}
\begin{document}

some text

{
    \fontspec[
  Path = "/u/tiarno/tests/sasmono/",
  Extension = .ttf]{sasmono}
\input{myoutput.lst}
}

\end{document}

The sasmono.ttf file is in the specified directory. When I open that file in FontBook on my Mac or in the font viewer on Windows, it shows a horizontal box-drawing character in slot 0x83 (131 decimal). The resulting PDF shows little boxes where the glyph would normally be.

The external file myoutput.lst is generated from another program. Am I missing something in my xelatex set up or maybe there's a problem with the font?

share|improve this question
    
U+0083 doesn't correspond to any character in Unicode. –  egreg Jan 31 '12 at 17:05
1  
Using Windows Character Map, when I hover over the character I'm talking about the tooltip says:U+0192: Latin Small Letter F with hook Keystroke: Alt-0131. Even though it says that stuff, the character is actually the horizontal box drawing character. As i said, this is a 'special' font. –  Tim A Jan 31 '12 at 17:07
    
Check that the external file is UTF-8 encoded. –  egreg Jan 31 '12 at 17:08
    
I don't think it is in utf-8. I open it with notepad+ (it opens automatically in ansi) and I see the small letter f with hook. I switch encoding to utf-8 but the display doesn't change. How can I tell the encoding? It was generated on a windows machine, but it is supposed to be used with this sasmono font. –  Tim A Jan 31 '12 at 17:19
1  
Well I think that it is currently quite unclear if the problem is with the font (e.g. if this font is to old and doesn't use unicode) or with the encoding of the file myoutput.lst. Try if the document works if you use e.g. \fontspec{Arial}: if yes get if possible an open type version of your font. If it fails with Arial too, use as egreg suggested \XeTeXinputencoding to declare the encoding of the file (or reencode the file). –  Ulrike Fischer Jan 31 '12 at 20:06
show 5 more comments

closed as too localized by lockstep, Marco Daniel, Joseph Wright Apr 15 '12 at 10:48

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