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I'm using bibtex and natbib in beamer (by defining the newblock command). I would like to have citations in the slides in the format (Author, year, abbr. journal name) instead of just (Author, year), without resorting to using \citep[abbr. journal name]{Authoryear}.

An example:

(Campbell and Cochrane, 1999, JPE) instead of the regular (Campbell and Cochrane, 1999).

I use abbreviations in the bibtex file (@STRING{JPE = "Journal of Political Economy"}).

Does anyone here know whether this is possible?

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Possible or possible using natbib? –  lockstep Feb 1 '12 at 16:52
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I assume that you're trying to add the journal's (abbreviated) name because the authors also had (at least) on other joint publication in 1999 that's also listed in the references, right? If so, it's probably a better idea to distinguish between the two citations by appending "a" and "b" to "1999". natbib will happily perform this task for you, without any intervention required by you. –  Mico Feb 1 '12 at 17:13
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Mico: Yes, I want it because authors often have multiple publications in the same years. In a paper I think that "a" and "b" are perfectly OK, because the reader can instantly turn to the reference list to check which paper I'm referring to. That's harder to do in a presentation, so therefore I want to provide just a little more info in the citation on the slides. –  jon Feb 1 '12 at 17:23
    
@lockstep: preferably using natbib (that's the only thing I've used), but any other suggestions are very welcome! –  jon Feb 1 '12 at 17:25

1 Answer 1

If you are willing to switch from BibTeX/natbib to BibLaTeX for your presentations, then this can be done pretty easily. In BibLaTex you need to define a new cite command:

\DeclareCiteCommand{\longcite}{}{%
    \printnames[author]{author}, \printfield{year}, \printfield{journaltitle}}{;}{}%
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