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As Mark S. Everitt writes in Table/Figure Layout tables/figures among other things should be looking nice, otherwise they are quiet useless. Ergo, one should pay the same attention to the information presented in the appendix. Now, I have created a pretty ugly one because I don't know better. :-/ Maybe someone has some suggestions to enhance the look of my appendix:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[latin1]{inputenc}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[german]{babel}
\usepackage{array}
\usepackage{lscape}
\usepackage{booktabs}
\usepackage{enumitem}% for control of list spaceing
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage{subfig}%for subfloat
\begin{document}
%\newcolumntype{C}[1]{>{\arraybackslash}m{#1}}
\newcolumntype{R}[1]{>{\raggedright\arraybackslash}p{#1}}% This creates a column type with no text justification
\begin{landscape}

\section{Appendix A: quarterly data}

%GDP
\subsection{Gross domestic product}
\begin{tabular}{R{4cm}R{4cm}R{4cm}R{4cm}}     %<--- damit geht es jetzt auch ;)
\toprule
\multicolumn{1}{c}{\textbf{Cluster 1}} & \multicolumn{1}{c}{\textbf{Cluster 2}} & \multicolumn{1}{c}{\textbf{Cluster 3}} & \multicolumn{1}{c}{\textbf{Cluster 4}} \\ 
\midrule
\begin{itemize}[nolistsep,leftmargin=*]
 \item Canada, France, Germany
 \item Austria, Belgium, Netherlands, Switzerland
 \item Finland, Iceland, Norway, Sweden
 \item Greece, Portugal, Spain
 \item New Zealand
\end{itemize}
 & 
\begin{itemize}[nolistsep,leftmargin=*]
\item Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, United States
\item Denmark, Ireland
\item Estonia, Hungary
\end{itemize}
 & 
\begin{itemize}[nolistsep,leftmargin=*]
 \item Luxembourg
 \item Czech Republic, Slovenia
 \item Australia, Korea, Turkey
\end{itemize}
 & 
\begin{itemize}[nolistsep,leftmargin=*]
 \item Poland, Slovak Republic
 \item Israel
\end{itemize}
\\
\bottomrule
\end{tabular}

%Plots
\begin{landscape}
\begin{figure}[htbp]
   \centering
   \subfloat[Cluster 1]{\label{fig:GDPClusterPlot1}  \includegraphics[width=0.45\textwidth]{GDPClusterPlot1.eps}}
   \subfloat[Cluster 2]{\label{fig:GDPClusterPlot2}  \includegraphics[width=0.45\textwidth]{GDPClusterPlot2.eps}}
   \hspace{1cm}
   \subfloat[Cluster 3]{\label{fig:GDPClusterPlot3}  \includegraphics[width=0.45\textwidth]{GDPClusterPlot3.eps}}
   \subfloat[Cluster 4]{\label{fig:GDPClusterPlot4}  \includegraphics[width=0.45\textwidth]{GDPClusterPlot4.eps}}
\caption{Identified clusters within GDP data}
   \label{fig:GDPClusters}
\end{figure}
\end{landscape}


\newpage




%p.c. GDP
\subsection{Per capita gross domestic product}
\begin{tabular}{R{3.2cm}R{3.2cm}R{3.2cm}R{3.2cm}R{3.2cm}}     %<--- damit geht es jetzt auch ;)
\toprule
\multicolumn{1}{c}{\textbf{Cluster 1}} & \multicolumn{1}{c}{\textbf{Cluster 2}} & \multicolumn{1}{c}{\textbf{Cluster 3}} & \multicolumn{1}{c}{\textbf{Cluster 4}} & \multicolumn{1}{c}{\textbf{Cluster 5}} \\
\midrule
\begin{itemize}[nolistsep,leftmargin=*]
  \item Canada, Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, United States
  \item Denmark, Iceland, Ireland, Norway
  \item Hungary
  \item Spain
\end{itemize}
 & 
\begin{itemize}[nolistsep,leftmargin=*]
  \item Germany
  \item Netherlands
  \item Czech Republic, Slovenia
  \item Israel, Korea, Turkey
\end{itemize}
 & 
\begin{itemize}[nolistsep,leftmargin=*]
 \item France
 \item Austria, Belgium, Switzerland
 \item Sweden
 \item Portugal
 \item Australia, New Zealand
\end{itemize}
 & 
\begin{itemize}[nolistsep,leftmargin=*]
 \item Luxembourg
 \item Finland
 \item Estonia
 \item Greece
\end{itemize}
 & 
\begin{itemize}[nolistsep,leftmargin=*]
 \item Poland, Slovak Republic
\end{itemize}
\\
\bottomrule
\end{tabular}

%5 Plots
\begin{landscape}
\begin{figure}[htbp]
   \centering
   \subfloat[Cluster 1]{\label{fig:pcGDPClusterPlot1}  \includegraphics[width=0.45\textwidth]{pcGDPClusterPlot1.eps}}
   \subfloat[Cluster 2]{\label{fig:pcGDPClusterPlot2}  \includegraphics[width=0.45\textwidth]{pcGDPClusterPlot2.eps}}
   \hspace{1cm}
   \subfloat[Cluster 3]{\label{fig:pcGDPClusterPlot3}  \includegraphics[width=0.45\textwidth]{pcGDPClusterPlot3.eps}}
   \subfloat[Cluster 4]{\label{fig:pcGDPClusterPlot4}  \includegraphics[width=0.45\textwidth]{pcGDPClusterPlot4.eps}}
   \hspace{1cm}
  \subfloat[Cluster 5]{\label{fig:pcGDPClusterPlot5}  \includegraphics[width=0.45\textwidth]{pcGDPClusterPlot5.eps}}
\caption{Identified clusters within p.c. GDP data}
   \label{fig:pcGDPClusters}
\end{figure}
\end{landscape}


\end{landscape}
\end{document}
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closed as too localized by Joseph Wright Apr 15 '12 at 9:04

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What is the purpose of the document and the appendix? Here in U.S. when you write a long document let say a Ph.D. dissertation in Mathematics a template is usually provided by your university. You can try to chase down some of those templates from the Internet and check sty files. –  Predrag Punosevac Feb 14 '12 at 2:26
    
I don't study in the U.S. but actually I'm writing a thesis for a professor in the States. It's on econometrics, so a lot of statistics and plots. Do you have any suggestions regarding templates for this type of thesis? –  John Feb 14 '12 at 2:32
    
Your thesis adviser should at least give you information where you can download official school style files. I am guessing that your advisor is affiliated to an Economics department. I would not be surprised that such kind department might require you to write the dissertation in Microsoft Word. This is not to say that all Economist are bad in TeX. For example PSTricks is written by an outstanding economist Timothy Van Zandt while he was writing his Ph.D. dissertation at Penn State many years ago. It is better to check now than to have problems latter. –  Predrag Punosevac Feb 14 '12 at 2:45
    
My adviser wanted me to write in TeX but could not provide any templates...bad luck for me ;) –  John Feb 14 '12 at 3:03
2  
Since he just wants you to use a template you can download something like this openwetware.org/wiki/LaTeX_template_for_PhD_thesis which looks very professionally to me. Actually it looks better than my own thesis. My template was provided by the math department at the University of Arizona and it looked ugly because it had to be based on the University standard which was written by some Microsoft Word clown. –  Predrag Punosevac Feb 14 '12 at 3:49

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