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I want to place a line or a bracket over a big text (of two or more lines length) and preferably preventing the hyphenation of this text. Is it possible?

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Perhaps you should also describe what you want to achieve, not how you want to achieve it. XY Problem –  Andrey Vihrov Feb 20 '12 at 9:37

1 Answer 1

Probably you want to use math mode to get the stretchy bracket then flip back to text

 $\overbrace{\parbox[c]{0.5\textwidth}{some text here}}$
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to remove hyphenation, put \hyphenpenalty=15000 and \pretolerance=10000 at the beginning of some text, as suggested here at StackOverflow –  tohecz Feb 20 '12 at 11:00
    
yes or perhaps more commonly if you don't want hyphenation, just add \raggedright which will mean that TeX will prefer to leave the line short rather than hyphenate, unless it is really desperate. –  David Carlisle Feb 20 '12 at 11:02
    
I believe that it would look wrong with the overbrace. Maybe \centering? But again, this depends on the purpose of the OP, which he has not mentioned. –  tohecz Feb 20 '12 at 14:04
    
on \raggedright` yes it would look better done with \begin{tabular}{l}` rather than \parbox then the box would have the natural width of the longest line, and the brace would just span that, assuming manual line breaking is acceptable.... –  David Carlisle Feb 20 '12 at 14:20
    
I will try to illustrate my question with an example: Let us suppose we have a normal text. And another text(2 1/3 lines length) exactly next to it(no new par or new line) . How could I put a line (or bracket or ...e.t.c) only over the second part of text and at the same protecting hyphenation? –  kornaros Feb 20 '12 at 14:32

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