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I'm having some trouble with the alignment in my document, I've put my code below. How would I position the sentence starting "All three conditions must..." to be aligned with the definitions/theorems etc.?

My itemised points (i), (ii) and (iii) etc. also seem abit out of place and lacking some line spacing? How would I get my document all in all to look something/aligned like the picture below?

enter image description here

\documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{report}
\usepackage{amsmath,amsfonts,amssymb,amsthm,epsfig,epstopdf,titling,url,array}


\theoremstyle{plain}
\newtheorem{thm}{Theorem}[chapter] % reset theorem numbering for each chapter
\newtheorem{lem}[thm]{Lemma}
\newtheorem{prop}[thm]{Proposition}
\newtheorem*{cor}{Corollary}

\theoremstyle{definition}
\newtheorem{defn}[thm]{Definition} % definition numbers are dependent on theorem numbers
\newtheorem{exmp}[thm]{Example} % same for example numbers
\newtheorem{conj}[thm]{Conjecture}

\theoremstyle{remark}
\newtheorem*{rem}{Remark}
\newtheorem*{note}{Note}


\title{\textbf{My Thesis Title}}
\author{My Name}
\date{\today}

\begin{document}
\tableofcontents

\chapter{Addition}
\section{Basics}
\begin{defn}
Picard's theorem is true if the following properties is valid:

(i) $x^2 =2$

(ii) $x^2 \Rightarrow e^2$

(iii) $\epsilon^2 = e^2$

All three conditions must hold in order for the theorem to be true, and there is an extra condition:

(iv)$ x^7$
\end{defn}

\begin{rem}
$x^2$ closed under multiplication and addition.

$x^3=e^3=e^3=e^3=e^3$
\end{rem}


\end{document}
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2 Answers 2

This seems like an easy job for enumitem that allows you to modify lists locally (via an optional argument to the list environment) or globally (using \setlist[<environment>,<level>]{<setup>}). Here's a preview of how you could use it:

enter image description here

\documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{report}
%\usepackage{amsmath,amsfonts,amssymb,amsthm,epsfig,epstopdf,titling,url,array}
\usepackage{amsthm}% http://ctan.org/pkg/amsthm
\usepackage{enumitem}% http://ctan.org/pkg/enumitem

\theoremstyle{plain}
\newtheorem{thm}{Theorem}[chapter] % reset theorem numbering for each chapter
\newtheorem{lem}[thm]{Lemma}
\newtheorem{prop}[thm]{Proposition}
\newtheorem*{cor}{Corollary}

\theoremstyle{definition}
\newtheorem{defn}[thm]{Definition} % definition numbers are dependent on theorem numbers
\newtheorem{exmp}[thm]{Example} % same for example numbers
\newtheorem{conj}[thm]{Conjecture}

\theoremstyle{remark}
\newtheorem*{rem}{Remark}
\newtheorem*{note}{Note}


\title{\textbf{My Thesis Title}}
\author{My Name}
\date{\today}

\begin{document}
\tableofcontents

\chapter{Addition}
\section{Basics}
\begin{defn}
Picard's theorem is true if the following properties is valid:

\begin{enumerate}[label=(\roman*)]
  \item $x^2 =2$
  \item $x^2 \Rightarrow e^2$
  \item $\epsilon^2 = e^2$
\end{enumerate}

\noindent All three conditions must hold in order for the theorem to be true, and there is an extra condition:

\begin{enumerate}[label=(\roman*),start=4]
  \item $x^7$
\end{enumerate}
\end{defn}

\begin{rem}
$x^2$ closed under multiplication and addition.

$x^3=e^3=e^3=e^3=e^3$
\end{rem}
\end{document}

To avoid a natural paragraph indentation, you can prepend the paragraph with \noindent (as I did with the paragraph "All three conditions..."). Compare this to the paragraph "$x^3=e^3=...".

For modification of the enumerate environment (or other lists) using enumitem, read the enumitem package documentation. For example, you could modify the inter-item spacing, the top or bottom separation with respect to other document elements, etc.

Interested in italized (small) Roman numerals? Use [label=(\textit{\roman*})]. There are many options to choose from.

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1  
rather than use \noindent to hide the paragraph start, if the sentence is part of an existing paragraph, not having blank lines around it is probably better. Makes a difference if there is non zero \parskip and is possibly semantically more correct. –  David Carlisle Feb 27 '12 at 1:16
1  
@DavidCarlisle: Good point! I see you've already addressed that in your answer. –  Werner Feb 27 '12 at 1:19
1  
yes we crossed answers I'd probably have deleted mine but for that, but I'll let it stand. It depends a bit what the OP needs, if all top level enumerations need to be roman, may as well just change it globally as in my answer, if you need to switch then enumitem (which is apparently a more up to date keyval version of my old enumerate) is a lot easier than repeatedly redefining internal definitions. –  David Carlisle Feb 27 '12 at 1:22
    
Thanks Werner and David Carlisle for your help, most appreciated. The enumerate command is very helpful! –  Gary Feb 27 '12 at 20:43
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Use LaTeX list environments for lists, and try to avoid using explict font comands in titles (the document class should take care of that) Something like this:

\documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{report}
\usepackage{amsmath,amsfonts,amssymb,amsthm,epsfig,epstopdf,titling,url,array}


\theoremstyle{plain}
\newtheorem{thm}{Theorem}[chapter] % reset theorem numbering for each chapter
\newtheorem{lem}[thm]{Lemma}
\newtheorem{prop}[thm]{Proposition}
\newtheorem*{cor}{Corollary}

\theoremstyle{definition}
\newtheorem{defn}[thm]{Definition} % definition numbers are dependent on theorem numbers
\newtheorem{exmp}[thm]{Example} % same for example numbers
\newtheorem{conj}[thm]{Conjecture}

\theoremstyle{remark}
\newtheorem*{rem}{Remark}
\newtheorem*{note}{Note}


\title{My Thesis Title}
\author{My Name}
\date{\today}
\renewcommand\labelenumi{(\theenumi)}
\renewcommand\theenumi{\roman{enumi}}

\begin{document}
\tableofcontents

\chapter{Addition}
\section{Basics}
\begin{defn}
Picard's theorem is true if the following properties is valid:

\begin{enumerate}
\item $x^2 =2$

\item $x^2 \Rightarrow e^2$

\item $\epsilon^2 = e^2$
\end{enumerate}
All three conditions must hold in order for the theorem to be true, and there is an extra condition:
\begin{enumerate}\setcounter{enumi}{3}
\item $ x^7$
\end{enumerate}
\end{defn}

\begin{rem}
$x^2$ closed under multiplication and addition.

$x^3=e^3=e^3=e^3=e^3$
\end{rem}

\end{document}
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Cheers David, and thanks for the additional comments also! –  Gary Feb 27 '12 at 20:44
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