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So I have this \[ min\sum_{i=1}^{n} \] which results in

enter image description here

What should I change to get this:

enter image description here

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Sorry for the short answer in advance. The \min command is already defined as a math operator and accepts arguments to be placed under. Notice the difference between the use in the text and the standalone equation use. (They are usually referred as inline math and displayed math)

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
Hi I want to use some numerical optimization method to solve the problem 
formulated by $\min_{S(t)} \sum_{i=1}^{n}$, but it looks terrible and my 
eyes hurt. So once again with much nicer,
\[
\min_{S(t)} \sum_{i=1}^{n}
\]
I still don't know what to sum up. That's some future work.
\end{document}

enter image description here

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You can use the \underset command with package amsmath

\usepackage{amsmath}
\[ \underset{S(t)}{\min}\sum_{i=1}^{n} \]

Edit: As percusse noted, you can use \min_{S(t)}. You must load the amsmath package however for it to work.

\underset is more general and can support non-standard operators such as:

\[ \underset{S(t)}{\operatorname{arg~min}} \]
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3  
Why use \underset if \min is an operator that takes limits (see percusse's comment)? –  Gonzalo Medina Mar 20 '12 at 13:04
    
I was asking myself the same question, just edited anyway –  Mobius Pizza Mar 20 '12 at 13:05
    
\min_{S(t)} doesn't require amsmath. –  Gonzalo Medina Mar 20 '12 at 13:11
4  
For limits under a "personal operator" use \operatorname*{arg\,min}_{S(t)}; no need for \underset. –  egreg Mar 20 '12 at 13:21
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