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I'm trying to get a caption to span the figure width on a wrapfig environment. But for some reasons it just won't go. Here is my code and a graphical representation:

problem

\begin{wrapfigure}{R}{0.3\textwidth}    
  \vspace{-30pt}
  \label{fig:UbiContentClass}
  \ffigbox[\textwidth]
  {
    \caption{A classe que define Conteúdo Ubíquo}
  }
  {
    \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{figs/UbiContentClass.png}
  }
  \vspace{-20pt}
\end{wrapfigure}
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3  
Please add to your question a complete and minimal version of the code illustrating the problem. –  Gonzalo Medina Apr 13 '12 at 2:48
    
...this will just make things easier for others to help you. Change your \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{...} into \rule{\textwidth}{...} and include at least floatrow and wrapfig. Don't use the minimal document class, but article rather. –  Werner Apr 13 '12 at 2:50
    
@Werner I don't get it - you're saying to replace 'includegraphics' with 'rule'? I tried this but it doesn't build: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{floatrow} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{wrapfig} \begin{document} \begin{figure} \ffigbox[\FBwidth] { \caption{caption text caption text caption text caption text caption text caption text caption text caption text caption text caption text caption text caption text }\label{...} } { %\includegraphics[width=.4\linewidth]{dummy} \rule{.4\linewidth]{dummy} } \end{figure} \end{document} –  David Doria Feb 3 at 18:05
    
@DavidDoria: The motivation is that we don't have the OP's figs/UbiContentClass.png. An alternative would be to use image from the mwe package so that everyone can replicate the problem without having to worry about missing images. \rule{<width>}{<height>} is how you should use it to create a black box of width <width> and height <height>. If you \usepackage[demo]{graphicx}, then all images will appear in 100mmx150mm black boxes, but that may not be the size of the original graphic. –  Werner Feb 4 at 16:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use \ffigbox[\FBwidth] instead of \ffigbox[\textwidth]. This will equal the caption width to that of object. Here is a screen shot from floatrow documentation for more details.

enter image description here

The MWE for your case:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[demo]{graphicx} % Remove demo in your file
\usepackage{wrapfig,floatrow}
\usepackage{lipsum} % provides dummy text
%------------------------------------------
\begin{document}
\lipsum[1-2]
\begin{wrapfigure}{R}{0.3\textwidth}
%\vspace{-30pt} % why this space?
  \label{fig:UbiContentClass}
  \ffigbox[\FBwidth]
  {
    \caption{A classe que define Conteúdo Ubíquo}
  }
  {
    \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{figs/UbiContentClass.png}
  }
%\vspace{-20pt} % why this space?
\end{wrapfigure}
\lipsum[2-3]    
%------------------------------------------
\end{document}

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
thanks! it worked :) –  Marcos Roriz Junior Apr 13 '12 at 16:48
    
The space is to remove the extra empty stuff. –  Marcos Roriz Junior Apr 13 '12 at 16:56
    
@Harish Kumar I tried this (without the wrapfigure) and it lets the caption be much wider than the image: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{floatrow} \usepackage{graphicx} \usepackage{wrapfig} \begin{document} \begin{figure} \ffigbox[\FBwidth] { \caption{caption text caption text caption text caption text caption text caption text caption text caption text caption text caption text caption text caption text }\label{...} } { \includegraphics[width=.4\linewidth]{dummy} } \end{figure} \end{document} –  David Doria Feb 3 at 18:06
    
@DavidDoria You have to use \includegraphics[width=\linewidth]{example-image-a}. note \linewidth instead of 0.4\linewidth. –  Harish Kumar Feb 3 at 22:52
    
@HarishKumar but then the image is also linewidth. I want to size my image to my liking, then have the text aligned to its edges below it. –  David Doria Feb 4 at 12:42

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