Take the 2-minute tour ×
TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When using \date{}, I get this weird result:

enter image description here (I've blurred out some parts, since they're, well, sensitive for me)

Why is it doing this?

I'm using isodate, but it's not the issue, I've commented it out, and it's still doing those weird numbers.

I'm using XeLaTeX to compile my documents.

share|improve this question
2  
It would be helpful if you provided a fully compilable MWE that illustrates the problem –  Peter Grill Apr 17 '12 at 2:33
    
Plus I think \date{} only sets the @date. It does not display it. Something else is producing the number. If you are trying to get today's date use \today. –  Peter Grill Apr 17 '12 at 2:43
    
What is contained within general.teh, since I'm unable to reproduce the problem. –  Werner Apr 17 '12 at 3:42
    
Perhaps better, what does \show\date deliver to your terminal. It should be \date=macro: #1->\gdef\@date{#1}. If not, I'm assuming general.teh is the culprit. –  Werner Apr 17 '12 at 5:45
    
To me it looks like a font problem. Either because the oldstyle numbers in the font used are broken or because the font exists in two version on the system an xetex gets confused. –  Ulrike Fischer Apr 17 '12 at 7:34
show 3 more comments

1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To me it looks like a font problem. Either because the oldstyle numbers in the font used are broken or because the font exists in two version on the system and xetex gets confused.

Put \XeTeXtracingfonts=1 in your document and compile on the command line with xelatex --output-driver="xdvipdfmx -vv" filename. Then compare the pathes in the log and in the terminal to find out which font you have double. Remove one version.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.