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I need to make my telephone number clickable. You might be familiar with this in Gmail's clickable phone numbers that dial out to your mobile phone, for example.

I'm working on my resume, and I'm using the res class. It looks like with what I want to do I have to make some changes to my class file, but I'm a little hesitant to do so.

Here's what I want:

*RFC 3966 compatible URL tel:: http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc3966#section-5.2 (see section 5.2)

I also want it to be formatted as an "ITU-T E.123 standard telephone number": http://www.itu.int/rec/T-REC-E.123-200102-I/e (see section 2.4)

So basically I want:

  • HTML source: "tel:15555555555"

  • Typeset as: "+1 555 555 5555" (clickable of course like HTML telephone links)

My final goal is to have a clickable link for a phone number without it looking visually different, just like my email address is. It is simply clickable and it goes to my email application.

Is there a package that does tel:? How do I integrate this telephone solution in res? Does anyone ever use clickable tel: links in PDFs?

*edit: I Found out here http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1164004/how-to-mark-up-phone-numbers that RFC 3966 supersedes RFC 2806.

UPDATE: I think I have escaped the domain of TeX with this problem. I used "You's" answer to make a clickable link that looks formatted properly. I'm just having issues with the functionality of the tel: standard among applications that use it. Not working: Foxit Reader, Gmail, Chrome (Windows OS). Working: Gmail mobile, mobile Quickoffice PDF viewer, Mobile dialer (Android OS).

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You can try moderncv and use \href command in the Tel: part. –  percusse Apr 27 '12 at 1:22
    
That is a nice idea. Are there PDF readers that know what to do with tel: URIs though? –  ℝaphink Apr 27 '12 at 12:44
    
Thank you percusse, I'd like to stick with res.cls class though, but the \href part helped! –  projectdp Apr 27 '12 at 17:25
    
Raphink: I'm testing it now. I'm counting on the idea that they do. I'm using Foxit reader, and it doesn't seem to know what to do, except it prompts me whether I want to try to open it. I'm also going to test in Chrome, and on my mobile. –  projectdp Apr 27 '12 at 17:28
    
I inspected a link that works in gmail: <a href="tel:222-333-4444" value="+1222333444" target="_blank">222-333-4444</a> I'm not sure that the hyperref package deals with these properly, or the applications don't understand the way it's being given to them. My browser just opens a new tab when I try "You's" method in the answers. –  projectdp Apr 27 '12 at 17:43
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1 Answer 1

up vote 22 down vote accepted

Just use \href from hyperref:

\href{tel:15555555555}{+1 555 555 5555}
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Thank you sir! I'm kind of curious how when I entered my email (in the tex file I needed no hyperref inclusion for the link to work, does this mean my pdf viewer is just awesome? I have since revised the tel and mailto links to be consistent. –  projectdp Apr 27 '12 at 17:24
    
@projectdp It might be the case that Skype taking over stuff. –  percusse Apr 27 '12 at 17:43
    
@percusse, that shouldn't matter. They are (to my understanding) using a non-RFC standard type called: callto:. Maybe I just need to figure out how applications know to use tel:? See my recent comments in my original post. –  projectdp Apr 27 '12 at 17:45
    
It does not work for me. A click on the link just lunches google chrome. I have Skype installed. What should I have more? –  Igor Kotelnikov Feb 21 '13 at 7:00
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