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I roughly know how fonts work in LaTeX but right know, I don't want to mess with the details. What I do want to do is to use:

\usepackage{[lmodern|palatino|times|...]}

to get matching sets of fonts. What "font sets" -- like Times for text, Helvetica for captions and Courier for code -- are available this way?

A pre-existing list would be nice but I suppose we could also maintain one here if none exists yet.

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2 Answers

  • lmodern
  • mathptmx
    • Serif: Nimbus
    • Sans: Computer Modern Sans
    • Typewriter: Computer Modern
  • mathpazo
    • Serif: Palatino
    • Math: MathPazo (matching Palatino)
  • garamond
  • fourier
  • kpfonts
    • Serif: Kp-Fonts Roman
    • Sans serif: Kp-Fonts Sans
    • Typewriter: Kp-Fonts Mono
    • Math: Kp-Fonts Math
  • MinionPro (requires commercial support files)
    • Serif: Minion Pro
    • Math: MnSymbol

Deprecated:

palatino--> mathpazo

times --> mathptmx

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May I guess that you use KOMA-Script and by caption you mean headings? lmodern say only redefines the serif, sans serif and typewriter fonts. What a heading or caption looks like is defined elsewhere. –  Christian May 3 '12 at 8:36
    
Indeed, I have changed the labels to the proper terms. –  Erik May 3 '12 at 8:39
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The site you'll probably find useful is this the LaTeX Font Catalogue. It also has to be mentioned that you could use LuaLaTeX which is probably already included in your TeX distribution and then use OpenType fonts with the fontspec package.

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That's a useful resource and I will bookmark it but it doesn't seem to have a list of "font sets". I'll clarify my question a bit. –  Erik May 3 '12 at 8:22
    
Well, it has a list of fonts, categorized by serif, sans etc. and shows for each font how it can be used (copy-and-paste ready). I don't know what exactly you mean by "font set" but you can use all the type styles a font supports. –  Christian May 3 '12 at 8:31
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