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Is it possible to use only numbers on front of every item? Something like this:

  1. ABC
  2. DEF
    • abc
    • def
      • xyz

But only with numbers.

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2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can use the enumitem package to define a list like the one you want; the following example is taken from the package documentation:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{enumitem}

\newlist{legal}{enumerate}{10}
\setlist[legal]{label*=\arabic*.}

\begin{document}

\begin{legal}
  \item First item.
  \begin{legal}
    \item First subitem.
    \begin{legal}
      \item First subsubitem.
    \end{legal}
  \end{legal}
\end{legal}

\end{document}

enter image description here

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thanks it works, but what does the 10 in the last bracket of \newlist mean? –  Alessandro May 6 '12 at 17:39
    
@thecruuk That number indicates the maximum nesting level for the created list (in standard LaTeX this maximum is 4). Please consider accepting the answer (by clicking the tickmark below the vote counting) that you consder solves your problem. –  Gonzalo Medina May 6 '12 at 17:42
    
Ok thanks. I had to wait 7 minutes to select an answer. :) –  Alessandro May 6 '12 at 17:44
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You can use the enumerate package (although enumitem is far more flexible), or manage the list numbering yourself:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{enumerate}% http://ctan.org/pkg/enumerate
\begin{document}
\begin{enumerate}
  \item ABC
  \item DEF
  \begin{enumerate}[1.]
    \item abc
    \item def
    \begin{enumerate}[1.]
      \item uvw
      \item xyz
    \end{enumerate}
  \end{enumerate}
\end{enumerate}
\end{document}
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