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I learned from How to obtain the current page number in ConTeXt? that I can obtain the page number counter value using tex.count.pageno, but I have not found this mentioned in any available documentation. I wonder, what other counters are available? Is there some place which has a complete list?

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As Taco said, there is no such list, but you could start a page on the context wiki and others could add to the list over time. –  Aditya May 10 '12 at 14:41
    
Is that what the small list is at the end of wiki.contextgarden.net/Counters? If so, I will try to add what new ones I discover to the end of that page. –  Village May 11 '12 at 0:44
    
Yes, that appears to be a good place. –  Aditya May 11 '12 at 2:06
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up vote 7 down vote accepted

The snippet tex.count.pageno is just luatex's representation of \pageno, which is more obvious when you realize that it is shorthand for tex.count["pageno"]. All of the \newcount-defined counters are accessible from lua that way, as well as anonymous counters by using tex.count[0], and that is in no way ConTeXt-specific.

There is no published list of \newcount defined counters in ConTeXt. You can grep the ConTeXt source for \newcount, but most of the counters are for internal use only and of no interest to normal users. \pageno is a bit of an exception because it is in use in plain TeX and inherited from there.

The more interesting counters in ConTeXt are defined using \definecounter, and these can be listed using code like this:

\startlua
table.print(structures.counters.data)
\stoplua

The counters associated with sectioning levels do not live there ,and I do not know where those are. Hopefully someone else will know.

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