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I want to use one font for text and another for dropped capitals. Unfortunately, the font catalogue states that one needs fontenc parameter T1 and the other B1.

Now, using T1 kind of works.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage{auncial,anttor}
\usepackage{lettrine}
\renewcommand{\LettrineFontHook}{\aunclfamily}

\begin{document}
  \lettrine[lines=3]{L}{orem} ipsum ...
\end{document}

That is both fonts are used:

with T1

However, pdflatex (rightfully) complains

./test.tex:9: LaTeX Error: Encoding scheme `B1' unknown.

at the lettrine command. Also, I noticed that the capital looks different when I use \usepackage[B1]{fontenc}:

with B1

Is it possible to properly use fonts together that need different fontenc settings? If so, how?

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3  
... and then you can locally get back to B1 with \fontencoding{B1}\selectfont –  David Carlisle May 21 '12 at 22:56
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1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

The documentation of auncial says

The Artificial Uncial font family is called auncl. The font is supplied in only the special bookhands B1 encoding. Thus, to use the font in a document you need to at least have:

\usepackage[B1,...]{fontenc}

in the preamble.

This means that you need to declare the B1 encoding as "secondary", announcing last the default encoding for the document:

\usepackage[B1,T1]{fontenc}

will be what you need for Western European languages.

The command \aunclfamily does

\usefont{B1}{auncl}{m}{n}

so you won't need anything special to go back from the B1 encoding, as the lettrine is typeset in a box, which forms a group.

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Oh. This seems obvious, now. Thanks! –  Raphael May 22 '12 at 6:54
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