Take the 2-minute tour ×
TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

One of my co-author's name has the pattern "Aaaa B Ccccc", where (due to transcription from Chinese) the "B" is indeed a single character (part of the given name). Now BibTeX (in abbrv-style) likes to render this as A. B. Ccccc (note the dot trailing the "B"), whereas I'd either like A. Ccccc or A. B Cccccc. I tried Aaaa~B or B\, but still no go. Any tips?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

This is really a nasty trick.

\documentclass{article}

\makeatletter
\newcommand{\onelettername}[1]{#1\aftergroup\@gobble}
\makeatother

\usepackage{filecontents}

\begin{filecontents*}{\jobname.bib}
@article{key,
author={Truman, Harry {\onelettername{S}}},
title={A title},
journal={J. Nice Results},
year=2012,
}
\end{filecontents*}

\begin{document}
\cite{key}

\bibliographystyle{abbrv}
\bibliography{\jobname}
\end{document}
share|improve this answer
    
A fabulous trick! –  Mico May 25 '12 at 17:44
    
Nice solution for numeric citations. It blows up for alpha (it creates a lower-case o), but I rarely use that one. Thanks! –  ShiDoiSi Jun 4 '12 at 8:04
1  
@ShiDoiSi In case the bib style doesn't make abbreviations, just say \newcommand{\onelettername}[1]{#1}, so that you can still use the same .bib file. –  egreg Jun 4 '12 at 8:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.