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Consider you have two group of footnotes: first group are normal footnotes and other one are a group of related notes.

How can number second group with different style? (for example: 1,2,3,... and (1),(2),(3)...)

Update: How can I number them like this: 1,2,3,(4),5,6,(7),... . Second group have parentheses.

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Perhaps a little more context? Will the alternate looking footnotes all be in one section (with no normal footnotes between them) or will they be spread out through the text? What have you tried doing so far? –  Seamus May 26 '12 at 15:03
    
@Seamus They are scattered over document –  PHPst May 26 '12 at 15:12
    
Related: Footnote number in braces / parentheses –  Werner May 26 '12 at 15:17

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

If they should appear in different apparatus you could use the bigfoot package (Gonzalo was faster...):

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{bigfoot}

\DeclareNewFootnote{A}
\DeclareNewFootnote{B}
\renewcommand\thefootnoteB{(\arabic{footnoteB})}

\textheight=80pt% just for the example

\begin{document}

Text text\footnoteA{Group one.} text.\footnoteB{Group two.}

Text text\footnoteA{Group one.} text.\footnoteB{Group two.}

\end{document}

If they must appear in the same apparatus you could use the sepfootnotes package. You then have to declare the actual footnote content separately, though.

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{sepfootnotes}

\newfootnotes*{A}
\newfootnotes*{B}
\renewcommand\theBmark{(\arabic{Bnote})}

\Anotecontent{first}{Group one.}
\Anotecontent{second}{Group one.}
\Bnotecontent{first}{Group two.}
\Bnotecontent{second}{Group two.}

\textheight=80pt% just for the example

\begin{document}

Text text\Anote{first} text.\Bnote{first}

Text text\Anote{second} text.\Bnote{second}

\end{document}

Edit:

If you want the separate groups to be numbered consecutively you need to do some redefinitions. Here's an example using the sepfootnotes package (it's analogous for bigfoot):

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{sepfootnotes}

\newfootnotes*{A}
\newfootnotes*{B}
\let\BnoteOrig\Bnote
\renewcommand\Bnote{\stepcounter{Anote}\BnoteOrig}
\renewcommand\theBmark{(\arabic{Anote})}
\Anotecontent{first}{Group one.}
\Anotecontent{second}{Group one.}
\Bnotecontent{first}{Group two.}
\Bnotecontent{second}{Group two.}

\textheight=80pt% just for the example

\begin{document}

Text text\Anote{first} text.\Bnote{first}

Text text\Anote{second} text.\Bnote{second}

\end{document}

enter image description here

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Thanks, How can I number them like this: 1,2,3,(4),5,6,(7),... –  PHPst May 28 '12 at 11:34
    
@Reza see my edited answer –  cgnieder May 28 '12 at 12:05

You can use the bigfoot package:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{bigfoot}
\DeclareNewFootnote{B}[alph]

\begin{document}

some text\footnote{A regular footnote} and some more text\footnoteB{An alphabetical footnote}

\end{document}

The manyfoot package also offers this functionality.

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Thanks, How can I number them like this: 1,2,3,(4),5,6,(7),... –  PHPst May 28 '12 at 11:32

Well, this works, but it ain't pretty.

\documentclass{article}
\newcounter{altfnct}

\newcommand\altfn[1]{%
  \renewcommand\thefootnote{(\arabic{footnote})}%
  \stepcounter{altfnct}\footnote[\value{altfnct}]{#1}%
  \renewcommand\thefootnote{\arabic{footnote}}%
}

\usepackage{lipsum}
\begin{document}
This is\footnote{is} a massive hack\altfn{Hacky hacky hack} but it seems to
work.\footnote{Text}\footnote{more}\altfn{Other}\footnote{Something}
\end{document}

If you wanted to have all the alternative footnotes to appear grouped, then some more TeX magic is probably required.

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