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I cannot see footnote in my document

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc}
\usepackage[L7x]{fontenc}
\usepackage[lithuanian]{babel}
\usepackage{pslatex}
\makeatletter
\renewcommand{\thesection}{\arabic{section}.}
\renewcommand{\section}{%
    \@startsection
        {section}{1}{0mm}
    {\baselineskip}
    {\baselineskip}
    {\fontsize{14}{14}\centering\bfseries\MakeUppercase}%       
   }
   \makeatother
\usepackage[stable,perpage]{footmisc}
\begin{document}
\section{a\footnote{b}}
\newpage
\section{c}
\end{document}

Why is it so and how to fix this?

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2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Your problem is twofold. The usual solution that works in most cases, that is,

\section[Title]{Title\footnote{Footnote}}

doesn't work because you apply \MakeUppercase to your section titles. Adding \protect in front of \footnote solves the immediate problem of typesetting the footnote, but its text will be in small caps.

The technically correct solution is

\section[Title]{Title\protect\footnotemark}
\footnotetext{Footnote}

The optional argument must be used in such cases or the footnote mark will appear in unexpected places as soon as you enable headers or try producing the table of contents. The \protect is necessary to avoid \MakeUppercase doing nasty things to it.

The stylistically correct solution is, as others have commented, not using footnotes to section titles under any circumstances.


I notice that you're using the obsolete pslatex package. Replace it by mathptmx.

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You need to \protect the command try this:

\section{a\protect\footnote{b}}

I am not too sure if this is a good idea though, having footnotes in headings (they will also appear in the TOC). A footnote, normally is an explanatory note and headings should give a clear message of the text that follows. A footnote in a heading means your heading is not explanatory on its own.

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3  
At the very least, the optional argument to \section should be used. –  jon May 29 '12 at 5:37
    
@jon Leaving aside the technicalities, one needs to revise the section text to be self explanatory. If need be to start the section with some explanatory material. –  Yiannis Lazarides May 29 '12 at 5:39
    
Another good reason for not having footnotes in the argument of the \section command is that -- at least with the current definition of the \section command -- the contents of a footnote will be typeset in all-uppercase even if the \footnote command is \protected. –  Mico May 29 '12 at 6:23
    
@Mico Not too sure about your statement. It worked when I tried it out and capitalized it. –  Yiannis Lazarides May 29 '12 at 6:34
    
@YiannisLazarides: With the OP's definition of the \section command, the entire argument of the command -- including any (protected) footnotes -- is rendered in all-uppercase. I can't imagine that this is what the OP would want. Moral of the story: Don't use \footnotes in the argument of sectioning commands... –  Mico May 29 '12 at 6:57
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