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I've written about a hundred or so lectures in LaTeX, all of which include a separate preamble document for consistency and ease of maintenance. Now that I have a SMARTboard in my classroom, I would like to import the lecture PDFs into the SMARTboard's software (called Notebook). I can drag-and-drop the PDFs into Notebook and it imports them automatically, which is great. But the documents are sized all wrong for the SMARTboard. Everything is too small to be legible by the class.

So I need to magnify the documents (by about 140%) so that the resulting PDF is sized appropriately for the SMARTboard. And I'd like to do this magnification from within the preamble so that all of my lectures are magnified consistently.

Here's what I've tried so far:

  1. I tried the \mag command, but I get an "incompatible magnification" error, and besides, I've since learned that using \mag is discouraged.
  2. I tried \fontsize{18}{20}\selectfont, but it has to be after \begin{document} instead of in the preamble, and it doesn't affect things like \section and \subsection. So that's no good.

Any ideas?

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Can you use \AtBeginDocument{\fontsize{18}{20}\selectfont}? As for the \*section stuff, that sounds like you should redefine for the (new) preamble. –  jon May 31 '12 at 19:31
    
So you are not concerned about the change in layout? Is a modification in the document dimensions an option? –  Werner May 31 '12 at 19:57
    
I've already modified the document dimensions so that the PDF pages match Notebook's page size. The type is simply too small, is all. –  Alex Basson May 31 '12 at 20:01
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5 Answers

Try magnifying the whole document using the pgfpages package from the pgf suite. The following code will magnify the pages from an a4paper to an a3paper scaling the page appropriately.

\documentclass[twoside,a4paper]{book}
\usepackage[left=80pt,right=80pt,top=0.75in]{geometry}
\usepackage{pgfpages}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage{lipsum}
\begin{document}
\mainmatter
\pgfpagesuselayout{resize to}[a3paper]
\lipsum
\end{document}

You can also specify an explicit paper height and paper width using:

\pgfpagesuselayout{resize to}[physical paper width=13in,physical paper height=26in]
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\mag should be used at the very beginning; just for demostration purposes, I use 2500.

\mag=2500
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{geometry}
\geometry{paperwidth=210truemm,paperheight=297truemm,margin=1.5truecm}

\usepackage{kantlipsum}

\begin{document}
\kant[1]
\end{document}

pdfinfo says

Page size:      595.276 x 841.89 pts (A4)

and of course you can put whatever size you want.

enter image description here

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\mag should work within the preamble as well (just before geometry). –  Yiannis Lazarides May 31 '12 at 20:56
1  
@YiannisLazarides It's less risky if it's at the top, but if you want to live dangerously ... :) Anyway it must be used with care as it's not officially supported by LaTeX. –  egreg May 31 '12 at 21:18
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As Yiannis and Werner already suggested, you can "zoom in" by simply decreasing the paper size. If your projector has an aspect ratio of 4:3 you could add something like

\usepackage[paperwidth=400pt,paperheight=300pt]{geometry}

to your common preamble. You might want to adjust the margins as well. Just consider the following example:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{lipsum}
\usepackage[paperwidth=400pt,paperheight=300pt, left=20pt, right=20pt]{geometry}
\begin{document}
\lipsum
\end{document}

(Actually that's more of a comment to Yiannis's answer, but I don't have enough reputation to post one.)

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Try the following document, alternatively commenting and uncommenting the pgfpages lines in the preamble:

\documentclass{beamer} % 11pt by default, slides are 12.80 x 9.60 cm
\usetheme{warsaw}
%\usepackage{pgfpages}
%\pgfpagesuselayout{resize to}[a4paper,border shrink=5mm,landscape]
\title{A Title}
\author{The Author}
\begin{document}

\begin{frame}
\maketitle
\end{frame}

\begin{frame}
\begin{itemize}[<+->]
\item One
\item Two
\end{itemize}
\end{frame}

\end{document}

enter image description here

enter image description here

Thanks to Andrew Stacey for prompting me to verify that my earlier assumptions were valid (they weren't).


Original version (not as good a solution):

Assuming we're talking about beamer slides for your document, and if you need overlays, this will get you part of the way:

\documentclass{beamer} % 11pt by default, slides are 12.80 x 9.60 cm
%\documentclass[20pt]{beamer} % 20pt option, slides need to be 23.27 x 17.45 cm
%\geometry{papersize={23.27cm,17.45cm}}
\usetheme{warsaw}
\title{A Title}
\author{The Author}
\begin{document}

\begin{frame}
\maketitle
\end{frame}

\end{document}

Original beamer slide (with default settings):

enter image description here

Modified beamer slide (with larger paper size):

enter image description here

It's certainly not perfect (unscaled navigation buttons, for one), but it's a start. There are some other margins and lengths to be scaled that I've not identified yet.

But if you don't need overlays, you should be able to use pgfpages to make handouts with a given paper size (section 21.1 of the beamer manual). Something like (untested):

\usepackage{pgfpages}
\pgfpagesuselayout[landscape,a4paper,border shrink=5mm]
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Can you explain why you can't use pgfpages with overlays? (I haven't tested it, but I don't see any reason why it shouldn't work.) –  Andrew Stacey Jun 26 '12 at 8:37
    
I can't explain it, and I can't presently find any documentation supporting my original assertion. As you suspect, there's no problem with it working. Updating my answer accordingly. –  Mike Renfro Jun 26 '12 at 13:04
    
It is certainly true there can be problems with pgfpages due to things getting moved about on pages, but that's about hyperlinks and absolute positioning. There's warnings about that in the pgf manual - maybe that's what you were thinking of. I think your example will need to be \pgfpagesuselayout{resize to}[landscape,a4paper,border shrink=5mm]. –  Andrew Stacey Jun 26 '12 at 13:10
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If you use the traditional

\documentclass{article}

interface, \normalsize defaults to 10pt. Opting for

\documentclass[14pt]{scrartcl}

\normalsize is 14pt - a 40% increase - with (somewhat) proportional increase in other font options as well. In fact, within the KOMA-script class, 14pt/baselineskip implies

  • \tiny @ 5pt/6pt increases to 6pt/7pt (20% larger);
  • \scriptsize @ 7pt/8pt increases to 8pt/9.5pt (~14% larger);
  • \footnotesize @ 8pt/9.5pt increases to 10pt/12pt (25% larger);
  • \small @ 9pt/11pt increases to 12pt/14pt (~33% larger);
  • \normalsize @ 10pt/12pt increases to 14pt/17pt (40% larger);
  • \large @ 12pt/14pt increases to 17pt/22pt (~42% larger);
  • \Large @ 14.4pt/18pt increases to 20pt/25pt (~39% larger);
  • \LARGE @ 17.28pt/22pt increases to 25pt/30pt (~45% larger);
  • \huge @ 20.74pt/25pt increases to 29.86pt/35pt (~44% larger); and
  • \Huge @ 24.88pt/30pt increases to 35.83pt/40pt (~44% larger)

The same holds for

\documentclass[14pt]{extarticle}
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