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I have written a talk in Beamer and to illustrate one of my points I've written a program in JavaScript (well actually Processing). You can view it here (it seems to run ok in Chrome and Firefox, and indeed on my phone). At the moment I Alt+Tab out of my presentation into Google Chrome when it comes to the relevant slide in my talk. This isn't such a bad solution, but it's not a nice solution.

I would like to be able to export my slides into html/svg and then use some combination of JavaScript and HTML5 to view my slides in the browser. Googling I wasn't able to find a well-documented approach to this, although there are a lot of snippets, mainly on this site.

Has anyone had success in doing this? And if so what tools/path did you use?

Such an approach loses the absolute portability of the PDF format, but gains practical portability in the sense that I could show someone my slides on a tablet with all features intact.

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Perhaps the output of pdf2htmlEX would be acceptable? –  cyberSingularity Nov 24 '12 at 10:11
    
Isn't it possible to import this javascript interactive view within a pdf (with the media9 extension for instance)? This way, you would directly have it in your pdf document. –  pluton Nov 27 '12 at 4:57
    
@pluton could you elaborate on how to do that? –  Bordaigorl Oct 12 at 9:58
    
@Bordaigorl Please see section 7 of media9's user guide [1]. The pdf format now supports .ud3 and .prc files that embeds objects that can be interactively manipulated within Adobe Reader (other pdf readers do not currently support these applications). [1] ctan.org/tex-archive/macros/latex/contrib/media9 –  pluton Oct 12 at 11:53
    
@pluton thanks for the pointers; however I was hoping for a way to embed a browser viewport in the pdf, not a 3d format. These javascript generated pictures are interesting because they are highly interactive and generated on the fly from maybe live data or user input... –  Bordaigorl Oct 12 at 18:29

1 Answer 1

dvisvgm could be a solution. It converts dvi files to svg files, see http://dvisvgm.sourceforge.net/

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