Take the 2-minute tour ×
TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm submitting a paper and am required to use a provided document class which defines its own theorem environments, so I can't use packages like amsthm or ntheorem. The class doesn't define a 'Definition' theorem environment, so I defined my own. I'm trying to get the body text not to be in italic, just like \theoremstyle{definition} does. Is there a way to do it?

share|improve this question
    
What does the current definition of your definition environment look like? Edit your question and include this detail. –  Werner Jun 10 '12 at 5:31
    
Welcome to TeX.SE. As Werner suggests, It is always best to compose a fully compilable MWE that illustrates the problem including the \documentclass and the appropriate packages. In this case the problem is related to your specific definition so without that it is difficult to help. –  Peter Grill Jun 10 '12 at 5:39
    
Werner, your answer will do. I don't have so many definitions that it's inconvenient for me to use this ad-hoc trick. Thanks! –  user18063 Jun 10 '12 at 5:50
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Ad-hoc restyling can be done using \normalfont at the start of the definition:

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}
\newtheorem{definition}{Definition}
\begin{document}
\begin{definition}
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. 
Sed eu eros dignissim mi ultricies varius in ac purus. 
Mauris et massa turpis. Aenean egestas fringilla odio, 
in placerat leo vestibulum non.
\end{definition}

\begin{definition}
\normalfont Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. 
Sed eu eros dignissim mi ultricies varius in ac purus. 
Mauris et massa turpis. Aenean egestas fringilla odio, 
in placerat leo vestibulum non.
\end{definition}
\end{document}

The above solution would hold for journals where you're not allowed to include other packages. If they don't mind and your definition theorem environment is defined very simply, you could use something like:

\newtheorem{definition}{Definition}
\let\olddefinition\definition
\renewcommand{\definition}{\olddefinition\normalfont}

to modify the start of the environment to always use \normalfont. This would then be a global change to the definition theorem environment. Of course, you need not use a theorem-style to create the definition environment in the first place. However, without much knowledge over the context and use, it would be hard to speculate on how you want it to look.

share|improve this answer
    
\upshape is another possibility. –  Werner Nov 7 '13 at 0:16
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.