Take the 2-minute tour ×
TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

consider the following (minimal) example:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[sc,osf]{mathpazo}
\usepackage{pxfonts}
\begin{document}
$=$ $\ne$
\end{document}

Is there any way I can make the "not equal" sign look exactly like a struck equal sign? Currently it does not.

share|improve this question
3  
You should load either the mathpazo package or the pxfonts package, but not both. As you've noticed, the math symbols provided by these two packages are not identical, and little good is going to come from (deliberately or inadvertently) mixing and (mis)matching them. –  Mico Jun 25 '12 at 13:14
    
Owh, alright. Do you know the correct way to get symbols like \blacksquare when using mathpazo? –  Jesko Hüttenhain Jun 25 '12 at 13:17
    
Yes: Issue the commands \usepackage{amsfonts} and \DeclareMathSymbol{\blacksquare}{\mathord}{AMSa}{4}. That's how the pxfonts package sets up the "black square" symbol; no reason to do it differently for mathpazo, right? :-) –  Mico Jun 25 '12 at 13:27
    
Alright, thanks =D –  Jesko Hüttenhain Jun 25 '12 at 14:25
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should load either the mathpazo package or the pxfonts package, but not both. As you've noticed, the math symbols provided by these two packages are not identical, and little good is going to come from (deliberately or inadvertently) mixing and (mis)matching them.

In a comment, you note that you need access to commands such as \blacksquare, which are set up by default in pxfonts but not in mathpazo. What to do if you decide to use the mathpazo package but need access to these additional commands? The definitions of these additional commands are provided in the file pxfonts.sty, and it shouldn't be too difficult to copy-and-paste the macros to your document's preamble. For instance, to get the \blacksquare command set up, you'd type the following in your preamble:

\usepackage{amsfonts}
\DeclareMathSymbol{\blacksquare}{\mathord}{AMSa}{4}

Happy TeXing!

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.