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I have the problem that I want to have nice looking math symbols for the classical sequence spaces like Schwartz space, convergent sequences, sequences with finitely many non-zero members etc. I like the \ell^p for p-summable sequences but want some calligraphic looking ones for the others as well. Currently, I use the calligra package with some experimental (and still improvable) scaling. It produces a rather OK c_0 and c but the f does not match at all. Any suggestions how to improve that?

enter image description here

here's a sample of code:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{calligra}          % used for sequence spaces
%
% Stuff for sequence spaces, more dirty than quick:
% use the calligra fonts for this, scaled a bit larger, only the "f"
% is too large...
%
\DeclareFontShape{T1}{calligra}{m}{n}{<->s*[2.2]callig15}{}
\DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathcalligra}{T1}{calligra}{m}{n}
% convergent sequences
\newcommand{\seqc}           {\mathcalligra{c}}
% zero sequences
\newcommand{\seqcn}          {\mathcalligra{c}_0}
% finite sequences  
\newcommand{\seqf}{{\mathcalligra{f}}}
% Schwartz sequences
\newcommand{\seqs}{\mathcalligra{s}}

\begin{document}
The classical sequence spaces are:
\[
\seqf
\subseteq \seqs
\subseteq \seqcn
\subseteq \seqc
\subseteq \ell^\infty
\]
\end{document}

Beside that, there seem to be quite a bit of kerning issues...

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I dont know the answer but {\mathcalligra{c_0}} looks better –  interlude Jul 2 '12 at 18:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I imagine that you are looking for a free solution, but it seems that getting a nice looking f glyph that matches the traditionally used \ell, and which is not confused with a function, is a rather difficult chore.

I suggest that you give a look to the commercial MathTime Pro 2 font set. It provides "Script" and "Curly Script" variants that have nice glyphs for all letters you need f, s, c and l.

Note: I have no relationship whatsoever with PCTeX. But after looking into this issue for a while, it seems this font provides a reasonable alternative from the aesthetical point of view, although it will be nice to see if someone has a free (as in beer and in speech) solution to this question.

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thanks a lot for the hint. They look indeed promising, but as you said, a free solution would be much more desirable. –  Stefan Waldmann Aug 6 '12 at 11:32
    
it seems that no free solutions shows up, so I will accept your answer. The fonts really look pretty... –  Stefan Waldmann Sep 28 '12 at 15:23

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