Take the 2-minute tour ×
TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This a typographical/style question. Inside a subsection (after just one paragraph) I have some theorems (amsmath environment). The word Theorem looks stronger (bold, starting with a capital letter) than the heading of the subsection, which is also bold and capitalized but it comes after the number of the subsection, which is not in bold. In a review the referee didn't understand that the subsection continues beyond the Theorem and I am guessing this typographical issue is the reason. Do you have some neat idea of how to solve this with some stylistic modification?

Edit: For example, a section probably won't suffer the same problem because the heading for a section appears centered, displayed in its own line. With subsections the heading of the subsection appears at the beginning of the sentence in the first paragraph of text from the subsection.

Edit 2: It is pretty clear that a section or subsection doesn't end until you find the next heading of a part of the paper of equal or higher hierarchy and the reader should just follow this rule. My question is about making stylistic choices to make this foolproof, so that it is the shapes in the text what tells you the subsection hasn't ended and not the brain reading the actual content of the text.

\documentclass{amsart}
\newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}
\begin{document}
\section{Section one} Here goes a lot of text from the beginning of this section. And it goes on and on and on...
\subsection{Subsection}
A little paragraph beginning the subsection. This paragraph has around three lines of text. It gives a few ideas about what the subsection is going to be about etc.
\begin{theorem}
Statement of the theorem. The statement is not too long but it is not short either.
\end{theorem}
And then the subsection continues as it is expected since no other section or subsection or part of the document has appeared yet. It just happens that the heading of the Theorem is disruptive.
\end{document}
share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

The following is the usual trick for dense two column articles. It's not a graphical or visual pointer, however makes a statement that a theorem would follow and the discussion would continue afterwards (I have put it with boldface characters but should be removed anyway).

\documentclass{amsart}
\usepackage{lipsum} % For dummy text
\newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}
\begin{document}
\section{Section one}
\lipsum[1-2]
\subsection{Subsection}
\lipsum[1] 
\textbf{This can be summarized via the following theorem: }
\begin{theorem}
Statement of the theorem. The statement is not too long but it is not short either.
\end{theorem}
\textbf{Together with the result above, now consider the next Latin paragraph: } \lipsum[4]
\end{document}

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
add comment

If it's not absolutely necessary to use the amsart formatting, you could change the sectioning commands. See this question for where to find the documentation for the sectioning commands. The specific styles for amsart can be found in the documentation here. As an extreme example, you could add a rule before each new subsection (I don't know enough to tell whether adding the rule breaks anything, if it does, I'm sure someone will point it out)

\documentclass{amsart}
\newtheorem{theorem}{Theorem}

\makeatletter
\def\subsection{\@startsection{subsection}{2}%
\z@{.5\linespacing\@plus.7\linespacing}{-.5em}%
{\normalfont\bfseries\hrule\vspace{1ex}\noindent}}
\makeatother

\begin{document}
\section{Section one} Here goes a lot of text from the begining of this section. And it oges on and on and on...
\subsection{Subsection}
A little paragraph begining the subsection. This paragraph has around three lines of text. It gives a few ideas about what the subsection is going to be about etc.
\begin{theorem}
Statement of the theorem. The statement is not too long but it is not short either.
\end{theorem}
And then the subsection continues as it is expected since no other section or subsection or part of the document has appeared yet. It just happens that the heading of the Theorem is disruptive.
\subsection{Another subsection}
That is distinguished from the one above visually.
\end{document}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.