Take the 2-minute tour ×
TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My girlfriend is teacher at primary school, she's new using LaTeX and she needs to make a "cute document" for kids, but I don't know how change the following items to make them look nice for the kids:

  • parts,
  • sections,
  • page number/number of pages
  • and all this things to make a cute document.
share|improve this question
5  
What do you mean by cute? –  Ian Thompson Jul 18 '12 at 10:44
3  
12  
Finally, a counterpart to How do I make my document look like it was written by a Cthulhu-worshipping madman?. Well, we could always go for Comic Sans, as Seamus suggested. –  doncherry Jul 18 '12 at 11:30
14  
You can use the cow font. There is a typescript for context but I do not know if there is a latex package for it or not. –  Aditya Jul 18 '12 at 13:27
1  
there's a thread on using the cow font with pdfTeX now. Using it with other engines isn't too difficult; there might also be a little package in the near future. –  Nils L May 23 '13 at 10:42

1 Answer 1

I made a humble attempt of a cute document with memoir and some Inkscape graphics. :) Please bear with me, after all, cuteness is in the eye of the beholder. :)

Spoiler alert:

! Don't laugh at my duck, please.

Jake and I were talking in the TeX and friends chatroom a few months ago about funny chapter styles for memoir. For the fun of it, we made a theme based on Super Mario Bros. I drew Mario and a goomba:

Image 1

Later, we added a feature that added as many goombas as the chapter number - Chapter 3 would have three goombas, and so on.

Jake made an awesome Yoshi code that extended his tongue to fill the line:

Image 2

Sadly, the code is not available, for obvious reasons: Nintendo wouldn't be happy. After all, those characters are copyrighted. What we did was just a humble case study of "different" styles for documents based on memoir.

That said, I think we could use some ideas from this "exercise". I drew two elements in Inkscape, a flower and a duck:

Inkscape

I then exported both images to a tikzpicture via a nice plugin called inkscape2tikz. This step is not mandatory, after all, we can simply print those images to a vector format - say, .pdf - and include them as images (it's way easier).

In order to make our lives easier, I created a new package called duck:

\NeedsTeXFormat{LaTeX2e}
\ProvidesPackage{duck}[2012/18/07 Duck style for memoir]

\RequirePackage{graphicx}
\RequirePackage{xcolor}
\RequirePackage{tikz}
\RequirePackage{xspace}

\definecolor{cffffff}{RGB}{255,255,255}
\definecolor{cffcc00}{RGB}{255,204,0}
\definecolor{c008000}{RGB}{0,128,0}
\definecolor{caa8800}{RGB}{170,136,0}
\definecolor{cd4aa00}{RGB}{212,170,0}
\definecolor{ce6e6e6}{RGB}{230,230,230}

\newcommand{\drawduck}{%
  ... TikZ code here ...
}

\newcommand{\drawflower}{%
... TikZ code here ...
}

\newcounter{myflowers}

\newcommand{\flowers}[1]{%
\setcounter{myflowers}{-1}\loop\stepcounter{myflowers}\ifnum\value{myflowers} < #1 \drawflower\repeat%
}

\makechapterstyle{weloveducks}{%
\chapterstyle{default}
\renewcommand*{\chapnamefont}{\color{olive}\bfseries\HUGE}
\renewcommand*{\chaptitlefont}{\hfill\bfseries\HUGE}
\renewcommand*{\printchapternum}{\chapnamefont\thechapter\xspace\flowers{\thechapter}}
\renewcommand*{\printchaptertitle}[1]{%
\drawduck\bfseries\HUGE\hfill ##1%
}}

The TikZ code is huge. The full sample duck.sty file is available here.

Now, let's go to our .tex file. I opted to use a system font, so I went with xelatex. I don't like to change \parskip, \parindent and line spacing, but I thought that for this particular document, some adjustments would make the text easier to be read by a kid.

\documentclass[14pt]{memoir}

\usepackage{fontspec}
\setmainfont[Ligatures=TeX]{Segoe Print}

\usepackage{kantlipsum}

\usepackage{duck}

\begin{document}

\chapterstyle{weloveducks}

\setlength{\parskip}{1.5\baselineskip}
\setlength{\parindent}{0pt}
\OnehalfSpacing

\chapter{The journey begins}

Hi, I am a duck. Quack!

\kant[1]

\chapter{The journey continues}

\kant[2]

\chapter{The journey ends}

\kant[3]

\end{document}

The output:

Chapter 1


Chapter 3

This is surely the most clumsy duck drawing ever in the history of duck drawing. :)

Note that the number of flowers grow together with the chapter counter. Kant text is provided by kantlipsum. And memoir is awesome, as always. :)

Hope you guys like it. :)

share|improve this answer
82  
I will use this for my thesis. –  Who is crazy first Jul 18 '12 at 14:53
6  
That is one awesome duck! And it's so clever, too! –  Jake Jul 18 '12 at 14:59
9  
After seeing your solution, I know what "cute" means ;-) Nice job! –  Gonzalo Medina Jul 18 '12 at 16:11
6  
i will not laugh, but i don't think your duck can swim. (as one knows from "peter and the wolf", ducks have to be able to swim.) on the other hand, it can probably fly. so i'd call it a birdie. (again, cf. "peter and the wolf".) definitely cute!!! –  barbara beeton Jul 19 '12 at 20:06
6  
Kantian prose in a children's book is really interesting. :) But probably they can understand it better than Lorem Ipsum. –  egreg Jul 20 '12 at 14:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.