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How do I show a code snippet directly in my text? I dont want to have an extra box for it like lstlisting or verbatim provide it. My example may should look like this:

The class List.class is...

Should I make a new command for grey background and code like font? Or is there a simpler way? If not, how to write a new command for that?

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Jul 31 '12 at 2:17

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2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Since LaTeX is meant primarily intended for printed text I would strongly recommend you to not use e.g. grey background, but just use a typewriter font, e.g.

The class \texttt{List.class} is \ldots

You can and should wrap this in a new command to be free to change the visual appearance later, e.g.

\newcommand{\code}[1]{\texttt{#1}}

so you can use a form which is free of formating distractions and conveys intention more clearly

The class \code{List.class} is \ldots

If, however, you are intent upon marking the text with a gray background, you can extend the above format with a color definition and colorbox from the colors or xcolors package, e.g.

\definecolor{codegray}{gray}{0.9}
\newcommand{\code}[1]{\colorbox{codegray}{\texttt{#1}}}

For more on the colors, see this tutorial for some other usage examples.

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The listings package has a command \lstinline{snippet} that is used exactly for that. You can configure its appearance (including syntax highlighting) using the package options.

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But backgroundcolor is not available for \lstinline. –  Oh my ghost Jul 31 '12 at 9:32

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