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How to make the first line of aligned equations sit in the same baseline as the bullet and make the equation left justified?

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\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document}
\begin{itemize}
    \item $3!=3\times2\times1=6$
    \item $\tfrac{5!}{3!}=\tfrac{5\times4\times3!}{3!}=5\times4=20$
    \item \begin{align*}
                    \frac{n!}{(n-2)!}   &=\frac{n\times(n-1)\times(n-2)!}{(n-2)!}\\
                                                        &=n\times(n-1)\\
                                                        &=n^2-n
                \end{align*}
\end{itemize}
\end{document}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

the aligned environment works just fine, with the [t] option to get the bullet on the first line:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\begin{document}
\begin{itemize}
    \item $3!=3\times2\times1=6$
    \item $\tfrac{5!}{3!}=\tfrac{5\times4\times3!}{3!}=5\times4=20$    
    \item $\!\begin{aligned}[t]
                    \frac{n!}{(n-2)!}   &=\frac{n\times(n-1)\times(n-2)!}{(n-2)!}\                                                            &=n\times(n-1)\                                                            &=n^2-n
                \end{aligned}$
\end{itemize}

\end{document}

output of example code

edit: added a negative thin space \! just before the aligned block to counteract the thin space \, built into the beginning of aligned. for some background, see the question Why is there a \, space at the beginning of the “aligned” environment?.

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I think you need to insert \! between $ and \begin{aligned} to remove the unnecessary white space. –  cyanide-based food Apr 14 '13 at 17:47

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