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I have a couple of floats in my document, which contain large Images (it consumes the half of the page). In this case, the figure get's its own page and no text goes on this page.

How can I configure this? I'd like to have text before and after the floats until the float doesn't use more then 75% of the page height.

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Are you using the options for the placement? For example, \begin{figure}[h]. –  Sigur Aug 23 '12 at 23:13
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May be ignoring LaTeX rules with ! option ([!tbph], for example) could be also useful in addition to @Werner comment (uhm...answer). –  Fran Aug 28 '12 at 3:03
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3 Answers

I didn't have had success with the \topfraction, but there is another important setting which gave me less float-only pages. With \renewcommand{\floatpagefraction}{.8}% I was able to specify that only pages with more than 80% of floats, will become pure float-only pages. The default is 0.6 so if a figure consumes 60% of the page it will get its own float-page.

HTH math.

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Default for LaTeX is to allow up to 70% of the top of a page to be float (set by \topfraction as .7); up to 30% of the bottom of the page (set by \bottomfraction as .3) and at least 20% text (set by \textfraction as .2). Perhaps increase \topfraction using \renewcommand{\topfraction}{.75} as a start.

For more on TeX's float algorithm, read How to influence the position of float environments like figure and table in LaTeX?.

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I had the exact same problem and I fixed it by setting the [ht] options for the figure environment.

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Providing correct placement options is a good start. However, as Werner says in his answer, you also have to adjust the parameters that LaTeX uses to get the proportions the questioner is asking for. –  Andrew Swann Jul 18 '13 at 13:47
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