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I have a few figures in my document not obeying the margin constraints:

\usepackage[left=2.5cm,right=2cm,top=2cm,bottom=2cm]{geometry}

Most do. But these one's don't... they are defined as the others like,

\begin{figure} [p]
\centering
\includegraphics[scale=0.6]{old_zig_1}
\caption{Example of a forward looking algorithm that identifies peaks \& troughs.}
\label{fig:old_zig_1}
\end{figure}

Not sure why. Any ideas? What are my options...? Simply change the scaling...?

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Superb. thank you. One more thing. Can I still use "scale" also or is that now obsolete? –  Rob D Aug 28 '12 at 22:23
    
You can still use scale. width is just a make things fit (or resize) within a certain horizontal width. Same goes for height. –  Werner Aug 28 '12 at 22:24
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1 Answer

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Images that are included can be scaled or resized to fit within your needs in a number of ways. Using scale=<num> is one way, to enlarge (if <num> > 1) or shrink (if <num> < 1) an image. However, in order to make it fit within a certain constraint exactly, use width=<len>. For example,

\begin{figure} [p]
  \centering
  \includegraphics[width=\textwidth]{old_zig_1}
  \caption{Example of a forward looking algorithm that identifies peaks \& troughs.}
  \label{fig:old_zig_1}
\end{figure}

will fit the image horizontally within \textwidth. For more options offered by the graphicx package, see the graphicx documentation (section 4.4 Including Graphics Files, p 9).

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