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How can a similar arrangement be archived (with ams*, aligned, multicol, etc)

1.2.3 Solve the following system of equations:

  a)        x -  2y -  4z =   1   b)     -23x + 43y  = 22
           3x -   y -   z =  -1             x -  5y  = -1
            x - 11y + 22z = 110 

  c)   x +   y - 4z -   u =  1    d) -23x + 43y   -t =    2
     10x -   y - 5z +  6u = -1          x -  5y + 6t =  -10
       x - 11y + 2z - 22u = 11         5x -  8y - 6t = -100
       x - 18y + 8z +  2u = -6 

with "full double", ie. vertical and horizontal alignment?

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5 Answers

Right. So.. one in Plain, too, so we can all be happy (defs go other way around from Antal's):

{
\tabskip=3pt
\openup1\jot
\def\+{&+&}
\def\-{&-&}
\def\={&=&}
\def\eqpart#1{\qquad\hbox{#1)}\enspace}
\halign{#\enspace&&\hfil$#$\cr
  a) &   & &  x  \- 2y  \- 4z  \=  1&\eqpart b &     & &-23x \+ 43y \= 22 \cr
     &   & & 3x  \- y   \- z   \= -1&          &     & &   x \-  5y \= -1 \cr
     &   & &  x  \- 11y \+ 22z \= 110 \cr\cr
  c) &  x \+  y  \- 4z  \- u   \=  1&\eqpart d &-23x \+ 43y  \-   t \=   2 \cr
     &10x \-  y  \- 5z  \+ 6u  \= -1&          &   x \- 5y   \+  6t \= -10 \cr
     &  x \- 11y \+ 2z  \- 22u \= 11&          &  5x \- 8y   \-  6t \=-100 \cr
     &  x \- 18y \+ 8z  \+ 2u  \= -6 \cr
  }
}
\bye

enter image description here

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Very nice. It's always fun to see solutions in things other than LaTeX, too. I understand that not abusing catcodes is probably better, but I'm fond of having, as far as possible, my TeX look like my output :-) –  Antal S-Z Dec 12 '10 at 22:37
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Another approach is using the pgf-tikz package and the powerful \matrix command. The code:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{array}
\usepackage{tikz}
\newlength\lena
\newcommand\iterm[1]{%
  \makebox[\lena][r]{$#1$}}
\begin{document}
\begin{tikzpicture}[every node/.style={anchor=north east,inner sep=0pt}]
\matrix[ampersand replacement=\&, column sep={1cm,between borders}, 
  row sep={0.5cm,between borders}]
{  
  \node {a)}; \&[-6mm]
  \settowidth\lena{$110$}
  \node {$%
  \begin{array}{*{3}{r@{~}c@{~}}r}
    x & - & 2y & - & 4z & = & \iterm{1}\\
    3x & - & y & - & z & = & \iterm{-1}\\
    x & - & 11y & + & 22z & = & \iterm{110}
 \end{array}$}; \&
 \node {b)}; \&[-6mm]
 \settowidth\lena{$-100$}
 \node {$%
 \begin{array}{*{2}{r@{~}c@{~}}r}
   -23x & + & 43y & = & \iterm{22}\\\
   x & - & 5y & = & \iterm{-1}
 \end{array}$}; \\
 \node {c)}; \&[-6mm]
 \settowidth\lena{$110$}
 \node {$%
 \begin{array}{*{4}{r@{~}c@{~}}r}
   x & + & y & - & 4z & - & u  & = & \iterm{1}\\
   10x & - & y & - & 5z & + & 6u & = & \iterm{-1}\\
   x & - & 11y & + & 2z & - & 22u & = & \iterm{11}\\
   x & - & 18y & + & 8z & + & 2u & = & \iterm{-6}
 \end{array}$}; \&
 \node {d)}; \&[-6mm]
 \settowidth\lena{$-100$}
 \node {$%
 \begin{array}{*{3}{r@{~}c@{~}}r}
   -23x & + & 43y & - & t & = & \iterm{2}\\
   x & - & 5y & + & 6t & = & \iterm{-10}\\
   5x & - & 8y & - & 6t & = & \iterm{-100}
 \end{array}$}; \\
};
\end{tikzpicture}
\end{document}

gives:

alt text

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Unfortunately, this doesn't achieve the complete alignment that the questioner seems to want (e.g., the equals signs aren't aligned between a and c or b and d). –  Antal S-Z Dec 12 '10 at 22:54
    
You're right but I only post an example. Change the node align to "north east" and put the numbers at the right of the equal sign flushright in a box of a fixed size. Then you are done. The alignment of nodes in pgf-tikz is very powerful and provides great flexibility. –  rgallego Dec 14 '10 at 17:15
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I would use alignat*, instead of array, since it's designed to handle spacing around operators like + and =. That would lead to lots of code ugly code which would look like x &-{}& 2y &-{}& 4z && &={}& 1 (where the && skips a column), which is what makes all of the existing solutions look ugly, too. But we can get rid of this noise with a little bit of catcode hackery. If we make +, -, and = active characters, then they can expand to &+{}&, &-{}&, and &={}& everywhere. We just have to store the plain text versions, so that we can write -1. And while we're at it, we're going to mostly want two &s every time we have one, maybe with some space in between. So why don't we make & an active character, which expands to &&? Doing all that—and taking care of all of the messy details I've glossed over—gives us the following:

\documentclass{minimal}
\usepackage{amsmath}
\usepackage{environ}

\makeatletter

\newcommand{\LinearSystems@SetupLets}{%
  \let\col=&%
  \let\+=+%
  \let\-=-%
  \let\===%
}
\newcommand{\LinearSystems@SetupCatcodes}{%
  \catcode`\&=\active
  \catcode`\+=\active
  \catcode`\-=\active
  \catcode`\==\active
}
\newcommand{\LinearSystems@Setup}{}
\begingroup
  \LinearSystems@SetupCatcodes
  \gdef\LinearSystems@Setup{%
    \LinearSystems@SetupLets
    \LinearSystems@SetupCatcodes
    \newcommand&[1][0pt]{\col\hspace{##1}\col}%
    \def+{\col\+{}{}\col}%
    \def-{\col\-{}{}\col}%
    \def={\col\={}{}\col}%
  }
\endgroup

\NewEnviron{LinearSystems}[1]{\begin{alignat*}{#1}\BODY\end{alignat*}}
\let\LinearSystems@OriginalBegin\LinearSystems
\def\LinearSystems{\LinearSystems@Setup\LinearSystems@OriginalBegin}

\makeatother

\begin{document}
  \begin{LinearSystems}{11}
    \text{a)} &[1em]  x -  2y -  4z &     =   1    &[4em] \text{b)} &[1em] \-23x + 43y &     =  22 \\
              &      3x -   y -   z &     = \-1    &                &          x -  5y &     = \-1 \\
              &       x - 11y + 22z &     = 110 \\
    \\
    \text{c)} &       x +   y -  4z -   u =   1    &      \text{d)} &      \-23x + 43y -  t =     2 \\
              &     10x -   y -  5z +  6u = \-1    &                &          x -  5y + 6t =  \-10 \\
              &       x - 11y +  2z - 22u =  11    &                &         5x -  8y - 6t = \-100 \\
              &       x - 18y +  8z +  2u = \-6
  \end{LinearSystems}
\end{document}

This produces the following output:

Multiply aligned output.

The single argument to \begin{LinearSystems} is one less than the number of columns in your output. You then write the equations using just +, -, and = for the most part; & marks a column that's been left out (e.g., when one set of equations is over x, y, and z, you'll need an & after the z column if the other set below it is over x, y, z, and w). It's also used between equations, so that they're separated; here, you should use the space specifier &[space] on the first row only (since all future rows will align to it). You have to use \- for literal minus signs (and \+ for literal plus signs, \= for literal equal signs, and \col for the equivalent of a single traditional &); if that's too irritating for you since you have lots of negative numbers, you could add, say, \let~=- to \LinearSystems@SetupLets, and write ~3 instead of -3.

The code isn't incredibly messy or terrible, but it's a little strange if you've never seen anything like it before. The basic idea is the following. First, we define a command which, when run, creates the various ways to access the original meanings of the characters. It's important to do this where the category codes have their original meanings, since catcodes are frozen after the definition of the command. We then define a macro to change all the catcodes, because we'll need it twice.

Next, we use \newcommand to make sure that \LinearSystems@Setup isn't defined. We then create a group, and change all of the catcodes. We need to change them here so that the \LinearSystems@Setup macro is able to contain \def+{\col\+{}{}\col} and the like; otherwise, since catcodes are frozen at definition time, TeX would get confused by trying to define a non-active +. Since \LinearSystems@Setup is defined within a group, it must be globally defined to be usable outside it; we can't (AFAIK) use \newcommand with \global, which is why \newcommand is used to check outside the group. Within \LinearSystems@Setup, we initialize the \lets, the catcodes, and the active characters.

Finally, we create a new environment. It's necessary to use \NewEnviron here, because \begin{alignat*} scans ahead to look for \end{alignat*}; \newenvironment would hide the \end{alignat*}, and thus break things. However, since \begin{LinearSystems} now scans ahead to look for \end{LinearSystems}, it breaks the catcode assignment, which must be done before the scanning. This is why we redefine \LinearSystems (which is called by \begin{LinearSystems})—to make it re-define the catcodes first, and scan ahead second.

After all that work, though, the code within the LinearSystems environment looks (IMHO) really nice :-) (Mostly, it has many fewer ampersands.)

Also, if you don't have and can't install the environ package, you could use the following hack instead. Define a LinearSystems environment somewhere between \makeatother and \makeatletter as follows:

\newenvironment{LinearSystems}{\LinearSystems@setup}{}

Then, in your document, instead of

\begin{LinearSystems}{\N}
  % ...
\end{LinearSystems}

you must write

\begin{LinearSystems}\begin{alignat*}{\N}
  % ...
\end{alignat*}\end{LinearSystems}

Not as nice, sadly, but it should work just fine.

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Now that's a very nice answer. Very detailed write-up. +1. –  Willie Wong Dec 12 '10 at 20:26
    
Great answer and a great solution which definitely makes its way into my archive. (+1) –  Thorsten Donig Dec 12 '10 at 21:18
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As already shown, the best possible alignment is done with an array environment. Here comes a more elaborated version.

\documentclass[11pt,a4paper]{article}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{array}

\begin{document}
  \[
    \setlength{\arraycolsep}{1.5pt}
    \begin{array}{@{}>{$}c<{$}@{\quad}rcrcrcrcr@{\qquad}>{$}c<{$}@{\quad}rcrcrcr@{}}
      a) &     &   &   x & - &  2y & - &  4z & = &   1 & b) &      &   & -23x & + & 43y & = &  2 \\
         &     &   &  3x & - &   y & - &   z & = &  -1 &    &      &   &    x & - &  5y & = & -1 \\
         &     &   &   x & - & 11y & + & 22z & = & 110 &    &      &   &      &   &     &   &    \\[2\jot]
      c) &   x & + &   y & - &  4z & - &   u & = &   1 & d) & -23x & + &  43y & - &   t & = &    2 \\
         & 10x & - &   y & - &  5z & + &  6u & = &  -1 &    &    x & - &   5y & + &  6t & = &  -10 \\
         &   x & - & 11y & + &  2z & - & 22u & = &  11 &    &   5x & - &   8y & - &  6t & = & -100 \\
         &   x & - & 18y & + &  8z & + &  2u & = &  -6 &    &      &   &      &   &     &   &
    \end{array}
  \]
\end{document}

However, this is very tedious. So you have to think about the relation between effort and result.


alt text

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I am not sure how much alignment you want. For the following I assume you want to align at every monomial, at every arithmetic operation, and all monomials are to be flushright. Then you should use an array environment if you demand such fine control on the alignments.

\[\begin{array}{rrcrcrcrcrrrcrcrcr}
a)&&& x &-& 2y&-& 4z&=&  1 & \qquad b)&&& -23x&+& 43y&=&22\\
  &&& 3x&-&  y&-&  z&=& -1 &&&&              x&-&  5y&=&-1\\
  &&& x &-&11y&+&22z&=&110 \\
\\
c)&   x&+&   y&-& 4z&-&  u&=&  1& \qquad d)& -23x&+& 43y&-&  t&=&    2\\
  & 10x&-&   y&-& 5z&+& 6u&=& -1&&              x&-&  5y&+& 6t&=&  -10\\
  &   x&-& 11y&+& 2z&-&22u&=& 11&&             5x&-&  8y&-& 6t&=& -100\\
  &   x&-& 18y&+& 8z&+& 2u&=& -6 
\end{array}\]
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