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I'm just starting out using LaTeX. I've successfully installed MiKTeX and the sffms package for formatting fiction. This is all working OK (converting to PDF). I need to convert my tex files to RTF as well.

I've tried latex2rtf, but it doesn't understand the custom tags defined in the sffms package. Pandoc ignores all the author/word count/header definitions in the tex file, resulting in a document with only the (unformatted) content.

How can I get latex2rtf, Pandoc or some other to-RTF tool to understand the tex file?

(If any editors feel so inclined: I was going to tag this with sffms and latex2rtf as well, but don't have the rep...)

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3 Answers 3

Converting latex files directly to formatted outputs like word or rtf is a pain. From my experience (need to output to Word files often), you should first create the PDF and start from there.

I use PDF converter pro, and it does an excellent job in converting to RTF or Doc. There are other (free) options available but many of the free tools do a horrible job in converting to natively formatted rtf or word documents.

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Thanks @Timtico. I tried PDF converter pro. Couldn't get it to work - it just locked up on me. –  Ash Dec 21 '10 at 10:41
    
Hmm, that seems to be computer specific. I tried a test version of Converter Pro and I was very happy with the results. That's why I ordered the full version which I will receive any day. I could let you know how well it truly works once I tested it abit more. I tried some of the online converters, and the most annoying thing was that I almost everything was placed in text boxes. This means the word document looks fine, but as soon as you try to edit it there is trouble.PDF converter pro did the trick however, everying formatted in Words own way. –  Timtico Dec 21 '10 at 12:10

Your best bet is probably to use TeX4ht to convert to HTML or OpenOffice format, and then import that into a Word Processor which can export to RTF. But don't expect perfect results. You can't put a lawnmower engine inside an airplane and expect it to fly.

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Nor can you put an oil painting in an NES game. –  SamB Dec 19 '10 at 7:46

I encountered the same problem, and was eventually able to get oolatex to work.

Here is how I did it (Windows XP, MikTeX 2.8)

1) download the tex4ht package 2) find where Windows has placed the folder (not the file). This is in Programs\Application Data\MikTex or something else weird (this happens even if you've installed MikTex to someplace without spaces in the filename, which you definitely should IMO).

3) Move this folder to C:texmf or whatever. 4) Open cmd.exe oolatex filename.tex Bibtex filename.bib (0r .aux i always forget) oolatex filename twice more.

I normally find it easier to compile as PDF until I've sorted out all the errors, then do the whole oolatex thing. Its easily saveable as RTF, and in my experience (which really only consists of compiling one scientific paper over and over again) its pretty reliable.

Hope this helps.

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