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Is it possible to define a the description environment size like it its possible with itemize and enumerate?

\setbeamerfont{itemize/enumerate body}{size=\small}
\setbeamerfont{itemize/enumerate subbody}{size=\footnotesize}
\setbeamerfont{itemize/enumerate subsubbody}{size=\scriptsize}

I have been using:

\begingroup
\small
\begin{description}
\item[aaa] bbb
\item[ccc] ddd
\end{description}
\endgroup

But I don't know if it is the better approach. Also, sometimes I prefer to use the following construction:

\begingroup
\small
...
\endgroup

For text, figures, tables or even itemize/enumerate to fit the contents in a frame, instead of using the shrink option:

\begin{frame}[shrink]{Frame title}
...
\end{frame}

Which I also don't know the better approach.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There's the description item template/font/color, but this only affects the labels in the description environment. To change the font size for the labels and the text, you can use the etoolbox package to patch description:

\documentclass{beamer}
\usepackage{etoolbox}

\AtBeginEnvironment{description}{\small}

\begin{document}

\begin{frame}

\begin{description}
\item[aaa] bbb
\item[ccc] ddd
\end{description}

\end{frame}

\end{document}

The shrink option is evil (see the beamer documentation). I would suggest you, however, to use a consistent font size and not to reduce it for just parts of your presentation (it introduces inconsistency and reduces the beauty of your presentation); try instead to redesign your frames (if possible) so as to contain less text.

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Thanks for the tips! I don't use shrink because I don't like the final effect. About changing some parts of the text, I try not do that, because, as you said it reduces the beauty of presentation, but sometimes I need that, e.g., when using text that overlays a PDF/PNG picture to highlight some of its content, because \normalfont is to big for that. –  cacamailg Sep 24 '12 at 21:31

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