Take the 2-minute tour ×
TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'd like to include some fancy start-of-chapter marks in my poster. I especially like these marks (see pictures below) in a Power Point template. I wonder if there is a convenient way to produce similar marks using LaTeX commands.

enter image description here

enter image description here

Note: by "LaTeX commands" I don't mean \includegraphics and things like that. I might as well just use Power Point. I am wondering if LaTeX could give me similar fancy marks that can be zoomed to arbitrary size with good resolution.

Also: I believe these marks are kind of standard, as I have seen them in several places. I am sure I have seen both marks in e-books, and OMG, the first mark appears in this page, right under the TEX header!

enter image description here

share|improve this question
1  
Actually, \includegraphics can used to include vectorial graphics (eps, pdf) which can be zoomed to any size. –  Javier Bezos Oct 5 '12 at 16:28
    
@JavierBezos Good point. I have to admit that my real problem with \includegraphics is that I am not willing to pay for high-resolution ornaments just for decorative purposes :) –  CherryQu Oct 6 '12 at 12:48
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 30 down vote accepted

You can also use pgfornaments; a little example taken almost verbatim from the package page:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[object=vectorian]{pgfornament}
\usetikzlibrary{shapes.geometric,calc}

\begin{document}

\begin{center}
  \begin{tikzpicture}[color=red!50!black,every node/.style={inner sep=0pt}]
  \node[minimum size=10cm,inner sep=0pt](vecbox){}; 
  \node[anchor=north west] at (vecbox.north west){\pgfornament[width=2cm]{63}};
  \node[anchor=north east] at (vecbox.north east){\pgfornament[width=2cm,symmetry=v]{63}};
  \node[anchor=south west] at (vecbox.south west){\pgfornament[width=2cm,symmetry=h]{63}};
  \node[anchor=south east] at (vecbox.south east){\pgfornament[width=2cm,symmetry=c]{63}};
  \node[anchor=north] at (vecbox.north){\pgfornament[width=6cm,symmetry=h]{46}};
  \node[anchor=south] at (vecbox.south){\pgfornament[width=6cm]{46}};
  \node[anchor=north,rotate=90] at (vecbox.west){\pgfornament[width=6cm,symmetry=h]{46}};
  \node[anchor=north,rotate=-90] at (vecbox.east){\pgfornament[width=6cm,symmetry=h]{46}};
  \node[inner sep=6pt] (text) at (vecbox.center){\Huge Ornaments};
  \node[anchor=north] at (text.south){\pgfornament[width=5cm]{60}};
  \node[anchor=south] at (text.north){\pgfornament[width=5cm,symmetry=h]{49}};
  \end{tikzpicture} 
\end{center}

\end{document}

enter image description here

And, of course, you can control the attributes (including size) using the options for \pgfornament:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[object=vectorian]{pgfornament}

\begin{document}

\begin{center}
\pgfornament[width=1cm,symmetry=h]{49}
\pgfornament[width=5cm,symmetry=h]{49}
\pgfornament[width=10cm]{49}
\end{center}

\end{document}

enter image description here

Processing the following code, you'll get a four page document showing the 89 predefined ornaments:

\documentclass[twocolumn]{article}
\usepackage[object=vectorian]{pgfornament}

\newcounter{ornnumb}

\begin{document}

\noindent\loop
\ifnum\value{ornnumb}<89
\stepcounter{ornnumb}%
ornament~\theornnumb: \pgfornament[width=1.5cm]{\theornnumb}\\[1ex]
\repeat

\end{document}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I am using the package for my poster. It's been great after a day's work! –  CherryQu Oct 6 '12 at 12:46
    
How do I install pgfornament.sty appropriately? –  macmadness86 Dec 17 '12 at 15:16
    
@macmadness86 extract the files from the .zip file and place them in the appropriate location under your local TDS tree. –  Gonzalo Medina Dec 17 '12 at 15:20
    
That answer was too easy! I always forget where the appropriate places are! Using mactex. I know it is somewhere in /usr/local/texlive/2012/. I also know I have to run some kind of cache command. texcache or something similar. –  macmadness86 Dec 17 '12 at 15:25
1  
@macmadness86 You need to run texhash; I am not a Mac user, so I don't know the exact details for Mac, but since MacTeX is based in TeX Live, this answer could be useful for you: tex.stackexchange.com/a/73017/3954 (particularly the third method described there). –  Gonzalo Medina Dec 17 '12 at 15:39
show 1 more comment

If you're prepared to use Xe(La)TeX, a number of Opentype fonts have a good selection of fleurons and other ornaments.

Here, for example, is a fragment from one of my visiting cards:

\newcommand{\ornament}[1]{%
    \fontspec{Zapfino Extra LT Pro}
    \fontsize{8pt}{10pt}
    \selectfont 
    \XeTeXglyph #1 
    \normalfont}%
...
\ornament{1620}

which gets you this:

enter image description here

I haven't included a list of fonts and/or ornaments, though, as I don't really think this is the place. Perhaps other users will comment or post additional answers.

share|improve this answer
add comment

you may want to have a look at vectorian and this disccusion on decorated borders.

share|improve this answer
6  
In my humble opinion, this is not a very sophisticated answer. Like this it should probably a comment. Maybe you can improve on it, show some code and the result, so to say add some "eye candy"? –  Tom Bombadil Oct 5 '12 at 20:41
    
Code is available at the given link. It is in French but can just be copied and pasted. I do not see the point of doing this here. –  pluton Oct 5 '12 at 23:03
2  
@pluton: "[A]lthough we value brevity, a great answer should still provide enough information so that even an inexperienced (but diligent and motivated) user can reproduce the solution just by reading the answer, and possibly following some instructions." "the solution should be entered in the text of the answer itself. Attributions to external sources are fine – and encouraged! – but just linking to solutions posted elsewhere outside of the site should be discouraged." -- Quality Standards for Answers –  doncherry Oct 5 '12 at 23:16
    
you could have just indicated the links :) Honestly, I disagree with these rules. In my answer (that should probably be a comment), I do not bring anything new. The pgfornament package is itself inspired by vectorian. Centralizing information is somehow problematic I guess on the net even though a limitation occurs when linked sites die. For original and sophisticated answers, I would agree. –  pluton Oct 5 '12 at 23:40
    
@pluton: Don't forget to use the @username notation when you're responding to someone's comment -- I just found your response because I checked back coincidentally. // I come from the humanities, I like to quote stuff ;) // If you disagree with the rules, feel free to discuss them on TeX - LaTeX Meta or in TeX - LaTeX Chat. However, I have a feeling these quality standards are so fundamental that you'll have a hard time getting them changed ... –  doncherry Oct 6 '12 at 5:48
show 2 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.