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Books often have a special letter (often spanning two lines) at the beginning of chapters. How can I create this in LaTeX?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 28 down vote accepted

The LaTeX Companion suggests looking at the lettrine package. However the usage seems to be a bit complicated and you need suitable fonts.

If you also accept fraktur letters, then the yfonts package has a very easy solution:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage{yfonts,color}

\begin{document}

\yinipar{\color{red}L}orem ipsum [...]

\end{document}

This results in yinipar example. The Companion suggests setting the paragraph with \fraklines to get better spacing. See what you like better.

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2  
Now one just needs to redefine \chapter to gobble up the space until the next paragraph and re-insert the space into the token stream, followed by \yinipar. Any takers? –  Konrad Rudolph Aug 1 '10 at 19:20

I found the lettrine package easy to use while also having customization options. The documentation is available at ctan. Using XeLaTeX, all fonts are available. The usual syntax is:

\usepackage{lettrine}
...
\lettrine[lines=2]{S}{tart} of the chapter

You can use color as well:

\lettrine[lines=4]{\color{BrickRed}S}{tart} of the chapter

I found that the package doesn't work well with verse. Sample: enter image description here

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whats the name of the font you used for that example? –  jstr Aug 5 '12 at 12:37
    
@jstr I don't remember. It looks like it might be Adobe Caslon. –  ipavlic Aug 5 '12 at 18:02
    
thanks for your answer, i guess its another one the S has another kind of serif :-) –  jstr Aug 5 '12 at 18:30

I agree with the suggestion to use the lettrine package and the yfonts (actually the s-yfonts) package. In fact, I used both together when I typeset The Wizard of Oz as a gift for my wife:

%% The s-yfonts package is nearly the same as the yfonts package found
%% on CTAN.  The main difference is that s-yfonts allows free scaling
%% to any size.
\usepackage{s-yfonts}
%% Use the Schwabacher black-letter family for titling
\newcommand{\titlefont}{\swabfamily}

\usepackage{lettrine}
\renewcommand{\LettrineFontHook}{\titlefont}

The lettrine package has an awkward interface, so I built a pair of macros that were easier to use in my opinion:

\def\LettrineWord#1#2 {\lettrine{#1}{#2} }

\newcommand*{\Lettrine}[2][]{
  \def\tmp##1##2 {\lettrine[#1]{##1}{##2} }
  \tmp#2
}

Here's how to use the \Lettrine macro:

\Lettrine{While} the Woodman was making a ladder from wood which he
found in the forest Dorothy lay down and slept, for she was tired by
the long walk.  The Lion also curled himself up to sleep and Toto lay
beside him.

It seems I didn't end up using the \LettrineWord macro, but I recall my original plan was to add it to the definition of the \chapter macro in order to make the first word of a chapter automatically have a drop cap. I think I decided against it because I needed to change one of the chapters to use a different font:

%% I much prefer the Fraktur `D'.  I really should have a virtual font
%% to do this automatically.

\lettrine{\frakfamily 
D}{orothy} lived in the midst of the great
Kansas prairies, with Uncle Henry, who was a farmer, and Aunt Em, who
was the farmer's wife.  Their house was small, for the lumber to build
...

I've been asked privately what the s-yfonts package might be. As it turns out, it must have been my own modification since I can't find any information about it online myself. The vanilla yfonts package includes commands such as:

\DeclareFontFamily{LYG}{ygoth}{}
\DeclareFontShape{LYG}{ygoth}{m}{n}{%
<10><10.95><12><14.4><17.28><20.74><24.88>ygoth}{}

From what I recall, that limits the possible font sizes to those specified. Since I wanted to play around with different sizes I needed fonts that freely scaled. Therefore, my s-yfonts modification rewrote the lines to look like:

\DeclareFontFamily{LYG}{ygoth}{}
\DeclareFontShape{LYG}{ygoth}{m}{n}{<-> ygoth}{}

It also added:

\usefont{LYG}{\gothdefault}{m}{n}

to select the Gothic font at the end of the style file. Details of these commands may be found in the font selection guide.

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This is probably wrong in so many ways, but it was fun to do :-)

\documentclass{minimal}
\font\Cal=cmsy10 at 25pt
\textwidth=.5\textwidth
\def\pstart#1{\noindent\smash{\lower3ex\hbox{\llap{\Cal#1}}\hskip-.2em}
  \parshape=3 1.5em \dimexpr\hsize-1.5em 2em \dimexpr\hsize-2em 0pt \hsize}
  % \parshape x (=number of lines) y (=amount of indent) i (=textwidth) [yi, yi,...]
\begin{document}
\pstart Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vivamus leo felis, ultrices a pretium non, porttitor eget ante. Nunc varius mattis consequat. Praesent interdum, libero quis pulvinar sollicitudin, risus est mollis nulla, ac dignissim eros nibh eget eros. Quisque molestie, turpis quis eleifend gravida, velit elit adipiscing libero, at accumsan ipsum libero a risus. Nunc fermentum pulvinar pellentesque.

\pstart Cum sociis natoque penatibus et magnis dis parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus. Aliquam imperdiet ultrices vehicula. Quisque tellus dui, ullamcorper non accumsan vel, tincidunt in nisi. Praesent sit amet risus at lorem egestas vulputate eget vitae sem. Suspendisse lobortis convallis nulla non suscipit. Proin at felis sapien. Vivamus eleifend, diam in hendrerit vestibulum, risus est rutrum tortor, in tincidunt tellus mauris eu ante.

\pstart Donec in leo nunc. Donec facilisis consectetur venenatis. Nam aliquet ipsum quis massa sagittis hendrerit. Fusce mattis nibh et dolor consequat ac pretium nisi ultrices. Vivamus pellentesque adipiscing gravida. Aliquam pellentesque urna eu eros egestas adipiscing. Sed vestibulum pharetra mauris ut eleifend. Praesent et urna a dui eleifend consequat non in odio. Fusce vestibulum dolor at mauris tristique facilisis rhoncus et augue.
\end{document}

enter image description here

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1  
It's cool to see the effect without needing a package. –  Nyiti Nov 12 '11 at 15:59

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