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I am trying to imitate a character that looks similar to an inverted 2. It can be seen at the start of the second last words in the following image:

sample with character similar to inverted 2

What I have come up with so far is using graphicx:

\documentclass{scrartcl}
\usepackage[ngerman]{babel}
\usepackage{graphicx,tipa}
\begin{document}
Si m"ue"sti d t"a\textesh\textesh{}en uf \scalebox{1}[-1]{2}tans \textesh{}icke

\emph{Si m"ue"sti d t"a\textesh\textesh{}en uf \scalebox{1}[-1]{2}tans \textesh{}icke}
\end{document}

However, this is not quite right. It inverts the character, but it is placed way too low:

inverted 2 positioned way too low

Is there a better way for inverting the character than using graphicx?

If I use graphicx how do I get the character back on the line?

share|improve this question
2  
You could use \rotatebox[origin=c]{180}{2} instead of \scalebox. But a font that has this special character (What kind of S is that? Is it in Unicode?) would be better. Should \textesh be a long s (= „ſ“)? –  Qrrbrbirlbel Oct 26 '12 at 18:46
    
How is this symbol called? –  krlmlr Oct 26 '12 at 18:49
2  
Forgot to explain: It is a suggestion for an uppercase esh (not the long ſ) in Eugen Dieth (1936): Schwyzertütschi Dialäktschrift [Swiss German dialect spelling]. It has never caught on, so there is no Unicode character. I wish to cite it, though. –  mach Oct 26 '12 at 19:04
    
The uppercase Esh is in Unicode but it does look more like a Sigma: Ʃ I guess you really have to create it on your own. –  Qrrbrbirlbel Oct 26 '12 at 19:10
    
LATIN CAPITAL LETTER ESH has the comment “African” in the Unicode Standard, and it is intended for orthographies of some African languages. In all fonts that support it, it seems to be very much like capital sigma. So it’s really not appropriate here. –  Jukka K. Korpela Oct 26 '12 at 19:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The upright form can easily be based from the “2”. The italic one is a bit tricky.

I don't think you can avoid creating your own character here or putting more graphical effort in it.

If you had that glyph in some kind of digital form you could include it in your document (License!).

Code

\documentclass{scrartcl}
\usepackage[ngerman]{babel}
\usepackage{graphicx,tipa}
\newcommand*\Esh{\scalebox{-1}[1]{\rotatebox[origin=c]{180}{2}}}
\newcommand*\Eshit{\raisebox{1.75ex}{\kern-.15em\rotatebox{-20}{\scalebox{1}[-1]{2}}}\kern-.1em}
\begin{document}
Si m"ue"sti d t"a\textesh\textesh en uf \Esh tans \textesh icke \par
\emph{Si m"ue"sti d t"a\textesh\textesh en uf \Eshit tans \textesh icke} \par
\end{document}

Output

Output

"h, "H and "Y

You can declare further short hands for other characters, too

\documentclass{scrartcl}
\usepackage[ngerman]{babel}
\usepackage{graphicx,tipa}
\newcommand*\Esh{\scalebox{-1}[1]{\rotatebox[origin=c]{180}{2}}}
\newcommand*\Eshit{\raisebox{1.75ex}{\kern-.15em\rotatebox{-20}{\scalebox{1}[-1]{2}}}\kern-.1em}
\makeatletter
\declare@shorthand{ngerman}{"h}{\textormath{\textesh}{?esh?}}
\declare@shorthand{ngerman}{"H}{\textormath{\Esh}{?Esh?}}
\declare@shorthand{ngerman}{"Y}{\textormath{\Eshit}{?Esh?}}
\makeatother
\begin{document}
Si m"ue"sti d t"a"h"hen uf "Htans "hicke \par
\emph{Si m"ue"sti d t"a"h"hen uf "Ytans "hicke} \par
\end{document}

inputenc, utf8 and newunciodechar

Make sure your TeX editor saves in UTF8.

\documentclass{scrartcl}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage[ngerman]{babel}
\usepackage{newunicodechar}
\usepackage{graphicx,tipa}
\newcommand*\Esh{\scalebox{-1}[1]{\rotatebox[origin=c]{180}{2}}}
\newcommand*\Eshit{\raisebox{1.75ex}{\kern-.15em\rotatebox{-20}{\scalebox{1}[-1]{2}}}\kern-.1em}
\makeatletter
\declare@shorthand{ngerman}{"h}{\textormath{\textesh}{?esh?}} % still work
\declare@shorthand{ngerman}{"H}{\textormath{\Esh}{?Esh?}}     % still work
\declare@shorthand{ngerman}{"Y}{\textormath{\Eshit}{?Esh?}}   % still work
\makeatother
\newunicodechar{ʃ}{\textesh}
\newunicodechar{Ʃ}{\Esh}
\begin{document}
Si müeßti d täʃʃen uf Ʃtans ʃicke \par
\emph{Si müeßti d täʃʃen uf "Ytans ʃicke} \par
"h"H\textit{"Y}
\end{document}

XeTeX, LuaLaTeX

If you often find yourself writing text with many “special” characters outside of a-zA-ZäöüÄÖÜß take a look at XeTeX and LuaLaTeX.

They offer default UTF8 input and easier Unicode support. (This still doesn't help you if you can't find a font that has your special Esh.)

share|improve this answer
    
You could certainly skew the italic "2" in the other direction (instead of rotating it against its skewing) with a TikZ transformation … –  Qrrbrbirlbel Oct 27 '12 at 2:33
    
Thank you very much for these suggestions! I think this is as good as it gets without drawing a new character (for improved line width etc.). Since I only need citing the character once, this is what I am going for. If I were to draw the character, I would certainly encode it as a variant of ‹Ʃ› (Unicode's uppercase ‹ʃ›). It is nice to see that even an italic inverted ‹2› can be faked. –  mach Oct 30 '12 at 14:00

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