Take the 2-minute tour ×
TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to write this equation in latex but couldn't accomplish it. Can someone help me?

enter image description here

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by Qrrbrbirlbel, Gonzalo Medina, Stefan Kottwitz Nov 4 '12 at 1:08

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
can you give an example of what you have tried and what you are having issues with. –  mythealias Nov 4 '12 at 0:37
    
What seems to be the problem with the equation? –  Gonzalo Medina Nov 4 '12 at 0:37
9  
Please don't ask questions "please do this for me" (see your question history). Show, what you have done til now and describe excactly what's the problem. –  Kurt Nov 4 '12 at 0:46
1  
This question will be closed as too localized. It can be reopened if you would modify it so that it shows a real problem. –  Stefan Kottwitz Nov 4 '12 at 1:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
\documentclass{minimal}

\begin{document}
\[\frac1b\sum_{i=1}^b\biggl[0.632\times0.5+0.368\times1\biggr]=0.684.\]
\end{document}

I'd like to know where you had a problem, though...

share|improve this answer
    
I get an error when I execute the above code. –  Vutukuri Nov 4 '12 at 0:56
    
@Vutukuri That code works without error for me. Perhaps tell us what error message you got. –  Stefan Kottwitz Nov 4 '12 at 0:59
    
It's working fine.Thank you. :-) –  Vutukuri Nov 4 '12 at 1:26
\documentclass{article}

\begin{document}

\[
  \frac{1}{b}\sum_{i=1}^b
  \left[\vphantom{\frac{1}{b}}
    0.632 \times 0.5 + 0.368 \times 1 
  \right] = 0.684
\]

\end{document}

The only problem is to determine the size of the brackets. From the sample it seems that in this case the size is given by the fraction before the summation. The solution is based on using \vphantom,

which makes an invisible box whose height and depth are the same as those of the corresponding \phantom, but the width is zero (Knuth, TeX Book)

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
Please refrain from answering questions like this which are overtly not appropriate for our Q&A format -- meta.tex.stackexchange.com/questions/2414/… –  doncherry Nov 4 '12 at 5:18

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.