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Say I want

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
\[cl(V, q) =\left (\sum_{r=0}^{\infty} \bigotimes^r V\right)/\{v\otimes v = -q(v,v)\}\]
\end{document}

enter image description here

How to make the "/" symbol longer to cover the height of the first expression?

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2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This way:

\documentclass{article}
\begin{document}
\[
  \mathit{cl}(V, q) =
  \biggl(\sum_{r=0}^{\infty} \bigotimes^r V\biggr)
  \bigg/
  \bigl\{v\otimes v = -q(v,v)\bigr\}
\]
\end{document}

Several comments:

  • don't use \left\right around summation and integration symbols, it produces way too large delimiters. (Better don't use them at all.)

  • cl seems to be one math item hence it should be placed inside \mathit for a proper spacing. (You can use \mathrm, \mathsf etc. as well.)

  • I made the \{\} in the last part a bit larger so that the set doesn't look so humble.

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The only thing I'd change is to add a thinspace (\,) after the opening round parenthesis, to lessen the visual clash with the sum's subscript. –  Mico Nov 6 '12 at 10:28
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Well you could use flexible brackets

\documentclass{article}

\begin{document}
\[cl(V, q) =\left.\left (\sum_{r=0}^{\infty} \bigotimes^r V\right)\right/ \{ v\otimes v = -q(v,v)\}\]
\end{document}

enter image description here

In any case you could use fixed brackets:

\documentclass{article}

\begin{document}
\[V \big/ \Big/ \bigg/  \Bigg/ \]
\end{document}

enter image description here

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1  
Instead of employing nested \left ...\right pairs, you could also use \left( ... \middle) \right/ directives. –  Mico Nov 6 '12 at 10:27
    
Just curious the notation $\left.$ does not show anything just acting as a paire of $\right /$, correct? –  Sun Park Joe Nov 6 '12 at 11:17
    
\left. is a 'white' counter-part of any \right. It's used for single felxible bracktes –  bloodworks Nov 6 '12 at 11:26
    
@Mico Yes. AFAIK there is no difference in the output –  bloodworks Nov 6 '12 at 11:28
2  
@bloodworks Actually, \left. and \right. add a horizontal space of width \nulldelimiterspace. –  egreg Nov 6 '12 at 11:47
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