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Consider:

Then, the sequence $k_i$ given by (3.38) is increasing and converges to 
\begin{equation}\label{eq:weired_equation}
k^\xi = k_1\times k_2 \times c \times d,
\end{equation}
where $c$ and $d$ are defined in the Theorem 2. 

I have the questions:

  1. What are the grammatical errors in the above piece?
  2. Should a comma be used after the equation \eqref{eq:weired_eqution}.
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1  
@WillHunting I don't 100% agree with you, mathematical language has some specifics, and mathematical typography as well. IMHO, this question is boundary here, but still ok. –  tohecz Nov 25 '12 at 19:45
4  
I'm 100% sure that the comma is correct (see my answer). On the other hand, I think that (1) There should be no comma after Then, and (2) there should be no the before Theorem 2 (you write Theorem with capital T, hence it is like a name). However, I'm not a native speaker, and one such should confirm what I say. –  tohecz Nov 25 '12 at 19:48
1  
@tohecz: math.stackexchange.com exists :-) –  Martin Schröder Nov 26 '12 at 9:50
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

There should be no difference in punctuation whether you write the equation on display or inside the text.

So since there would be a comma if written inside the text, the comma is correct.


Considering the 1st question, see my comment. In the end, the piece can look like

Then the sequence $k_i$ given by (3.38) is increasing and converges to 
\begin{equation}\label{eq:weired_equation}
k^\xi = k_1\times k_2 \times c \times d,
\end{equation}
where $c$ and $d$ are defined in Theorem 2. 

In the label, there's a typo and it should be weird_equation, but I did not correct this to avoid you problems with cross-referencing.

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