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This resembles what I want:

enter image description here

Unfortunately, both braces are too big. I would like the brace on the top to enclose the variables, that is, span from (x_0 to \x_i). The brace on the right should enclose only the equations. How can I fix this?


Code:

\begin{equation}
  \left.
  \overbrace{
  \begin{array}{l@{\,}l}
    F_1(x_0, x_1) & =0 \\
    \vdots \qquad\qquad \ddots & \\
    F_i(x_0, x_1, \dots ,x_i) & =0 \\
  \end{array}
  }^\textrm{$d_0+\cdots+d_i$\mbox{~variables}}
  \right\} \quad d_1 + \cdots + d_i \mbox{~equations}
\end{equation}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

enter image description here

\documentclass{article}

\begin{document}

\begin{equation}
  \left.
  \raisebox{10pt}[30pt]{\smash{$\begin{array}{r@{}l@{\,}l}
   &  d_0+\cdots+d_i\rlap{~variables}&\\
   &  $\downbracefill$&\\
    F_1(&x_0, x_1) & =0 \\
   & \vdots \qquad\qquad \ddots & \\
    F_i(&x_0, x_1, \dots ,x_i) & =0 \\
  \end{array}$}}
  \right\} \quad d_1 + \cdots + d_i \mbox{~equations}
\end{equation}

\end{document}

I just chose the values by eye for the default font setup. By playing with the 10pt and 30pt in my answer you can make the vertical brace any size at all, and affect its vertical position. This will overprint preceding text unless you add a suitable \vspace{...} space wither before the whole equation, or if you need to embed this as a subterm, you could wrap it in a one-column array and again place some vertical space above the expression within the array.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, it is almost OK, please check my updated question, and how it looks on my machine. Could you make the brace on the right make a little bit smaller so that it only encloses the equations? That is, the uppermost part should go only to the top of F_1 but do not enclose the upper brace and goes down to F_i inclusive. –  Ali Dec 3 '12 at 12:15
1  
looking at the size of the brace in your image you are using a different font setup please always post complete documents showing all relevant packages loaded, not just fragments By playing with the 10pt and 30pt in my answer you can make the brace any size at all. To avoid the overprinting you could use a vspace before the equation. –  David Carlisle Dec 3 '12 at 12:30
    
"please always post complete documents showing all relevant packages loaded, not just fragments" Yes, I understand the importance of that. Unfortunately, it is not a very practical advice: I have to use some legacy style file doing all sorts of black magic. Believe me, nobody wants to deal with that legacy file. In any case, please add to your answer "By playing with the 10pt and 30pt in my answer you can make the brace any size at all.", I would like to accept it. Thanks! –  Ali Dec 3 '12 at 12:51
    
And the answer is upvoted and accepted :) –  Ali Dec 3 '12 at 13:05

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