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I have a section which describes a set of 6 images. After adding the section and the images just below it, the images were not placed in the correct place. Some of them were placed after the section, which is the correct thing, but the others were placed after the next section. Is there anyway to solve that?

Here is how I want my page to look:

Image 1  |  Image 4
Image 2  |  Image 5
Image 3  |  Image 6
         |
.......  |   .......
.......  |   .......

The dots represent the text of the page. Obviously, the page is in two-columns.

Finally, here is the code I am using.

\section{....}

<Section Text Referencing The 5 Figures Below>

\begin{figure}[h]
    \begin{center}
    \includegraphics[width=3.0in]{example1_scene.png}
    \end{center}
\end{figure}

\begin{figure}[h]
    \begin{center}
    \includegraphics[width=3.0in]{example1_topview.png}
    \end{center}
\end{figure}

\begin{figure}[h]
    \begin{center}
    \includegraphics[width=3.0in]{on_smith_and_screen.png}
    \end{center}
\end{figure}

\begin{figure}[h]
    \begin{center}
    \includegraphics[width=3.0in]{example1_2.png}
    \end{center}
\end{figure}

\begin{figure}[h]
    \begin{center}
    \includegraphics[width=3.0in]{example1_3.png}
    \end{center}
\end{figure}

\begin{figure}[h]
    \begin{center}
    \includegraphics[width=3.0in]{example1_4.png}
    \end{center}
\end{figure}
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2 Answers 2

The figure environment is designed to float, which is what accounts for the behaviour you are seeing. If you want to group your figures together, you could put each \includegraphics commands (not the figure commands) into a tabular environment, or a minipage environment or you could use the subfig package to organise groups of figures with subcaptions. The subfig package documentation gives lots of options to show you how to do this (including a useful section on whether you even need the package or not.)

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Within a figure environment, use \centering instead of \begin{center}...\end{center}. The latter adds extra vertical space. You don't even need a figure environment since you don't need floating neither captions or references. So, you could just write

\begin{center}
\includegraphics[width=3.0in]{example1_scene.png}

\includegraphics[width=3.0in]{example1_topview.png}

...
\end{center}

or similar with \centering. If you need captions or justification, refer to Alan's good advice.

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Thanks Stefan, your comments are always great. Yes, I need captions. –  Promather Jan 10 '11 at 7:45

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