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For a comparison table I am using the symbols of wasysym which gives me an empty circle, a full circle and also half filled circle.

However I would rather use a more fine grained sale and for this I need also a quarterly filled circle and a circle which is filled by 3/4.

Does anyone know if such symbols exist in any LaTeX package?

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Welcome to TeX.sx! This question is very similar to tex.stackexchange.com/questions/14/how-to-look-up-a-symbol. Please take a look at it as the information there might help you. If so, that's great, and we'll probably close this question as a duplicate just to keep the place tidy and to help people find answers quickly. If not, please edit your question here to explain why so that people can better focus their attention to help you. –  lockstep Dec 8 '12 at 13:08
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@percusse and voters for closing: did you check that the required symbols are there? They aren't. –  egreg Dec 8 '12 at 13:19
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@egreg It's in the universal package under \bauquarter macro –  percusse Dec 8 '12 at 13:37
    
Or \manfilledquartercircle from manfnt to be combined with an empty circle. –  percusse Dec 8 '12 at 13:42
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for whatever it's worth, these symbols are in unicode as U+25D4 and U+25D5, so should be in the xits and stix fonts. –  barbara beeton Dec 8 '12 at 14:02
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2 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Not the best macro in the world, but perhaps something like

\usepackage{tikz}

\newcommand{\pie}[1]{%
\begin{tikzpicture}
 \draw (0,0) circle (1ex);\fill (1ex,0) arc (0:#1:1ex) -- (0,0) -- cycle;
\end{tikzpicture}%
}

And an example

Hello world \pie{90} \pie{120} \pie{240} \pie{270}

Output:

enter image description here

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+1 nicely done! It's generally best to post a complete MWE though; just remember it for next time :) –  cmhughes Dec 8 '12 at 15:58
    
Thanks, however I would need the circle to work "clockwise". Your solution is elegant, however it has its origin not at the top of the circle and it goes counter-clockwise... I tried to modify your macro, however it always did mess up the arc... can you help me out? –  Conman Dec 8 '12 at 23:10
    
@Conman Just put -#1 inside the macro or enter the angles with a minus sign e.g. \pie{-120} –  percusse Dec 9 '12 at 0:15
    
@percusse: Yes, you are right, that changes the dircetion into clock-wise, however the "origin" is still not at the top but instead at 3 o'clock... any idea how to fix this, too? –  Conman Dec 9 '12 at 7:40
    
Got it myself: \fill[rotate=90] does that. Thanks to you all! –  Conman Dec 9 '12 at 8:32
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Circle with upper right quadrant black: ◔ Unicode hexadecimal: 0x25d4 In block: Geometric Shapes

There are probably symbols that black each of the four quadrants separately, or you can rotate this one: see Is there a readymade symbol for a 90 degrees rotated \Bowtie? for rotation code.

I found the answer with http://shapecatcher.com/.

Edit: @Barbara Beeton comments above ... these symbols are in unicode as U+25D4 and U+25D5, so should be in the xits and stix fonts. Then the answer here may help: Is it already possible to use the STIX fonts?

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Thanks! can you tell me how to insert this unicode symbol in my latex document? –  Conman Dec 8 '12 at 22:35
    
@Conman Answer edited with information I hope helps. –  Ethan Bolker Dec 8 '12 at 23:42
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