Take the 2-minute tour ×
TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a collection of articles written in latex, and I would like to "merge" them into a larger thesis document, in which each article will be a chapter. I have been looking at include and input, which are great if you start with the meta-document in mind. However in my articles I have sometimes a bit exotic dependencies, such as dot2texi, and using the naive approach fails rather abysmally with all kinds of broken paths.

So I was wondering, do you recommend any "best practices" for merging non-trivial documents -- which packages to look at, or to avoid at all cost, etc.

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
Take a look at the combine package. –  Stephan Lehmke Dec 15 '12 at 21:00
    
You can also look at pgfpages. –  recluze Dec 16 '12 at 5:47
    
Perhaps you could use the techniques described here: tex.stackexchange.com/questions/116665/… –  Steven B. Segletes Jun 5 '13 at 16:02
    
@recluze: Is there pgfpages installed in your machine? –  Who is crazy first Sep 8 '13 at 7:56

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

While there are packages to combine documents, they all impose at least some requirements on the nature of the included items. Thus the most general way to deal with the problem is to typeset the parts separately then combine the resulting PDF files, probably using pdfpages. To get page numbering correct, the usual approach is to suppress it in the individual PDF files and add page numbers at the combination stage. To give more detail, we'll need to have more information on the files to be combined: for example, cross-referencing may be required, which can be done using xr (see for example Cross-referencing between files and equation counters).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.