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When I put a figure into my document (doesn't have to be bitmap, PS does the trick as well, I think the distinction is color vs no color), the on-screen resolution of the text changes at the default level I'm viewing it. Basically the effect is that as soon a figure is included, the quality of the PDF seems to get worse. If I zoom in a bit, it gets better, but I'd of course like my PDFs to look properly in full-page mode as well... I don't know what setting this might be - maybe someone knows the phenomenon.

Edit: The two screenshots below show the phenomenon with differents levels of zoom. The left is the "broken" one. The right one is how things look like when no figure is "near".

Screenshot Screenshot

Edit 2: Interestingly, I get back the right preview from the broken one if I print the left document into a new pdf via CutePDF. This is not a real solution (file size gets blown up for other reasons) but shows that information isn't really lost, just somehow weirdly displayed as it seems.

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I think a screenshot would be nice. (Hope you don't mind that I removed your intro and closing.) –  Hendrik Vogt Jan 14 '11 at 16:42
    
I have seen this quite many times with old acrobat versions in windows. It seems to point towards a problem caused by the pdf-viewer used. afaik there was never a real solution for it besides general hints such as "update the viewer". –  Martin H Jan 14 '11 at 17:02
    
@Martin: you are right. Well I got the newest Acrobat on Windows. But using an alternative reader, the effect doesn't take place. I guess I'll just have to live with it then. Thanks! I'd accept your answer but it's not an answer ;) –  Nicolas78 Jan 14 '11 at 17:28
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This looks a lot like the effect I see with Acrobat Reader on Windows, when I include an image with an alpha layer (or even any kind of transparency generated by figure creation packages, etc.) If that could apply to anything in the "nearby" figure, try recreating it without the transparency. For example, resave the image with a white background rather than a transparent one.

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Very nice, that's it. Couldn't quite figure out when it happens and put it on vector-vs bitmap graphics but that didn't quite fit either. –  Nicolas78 Jan 21 '11 at 11:24
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