Take the 2-minute tour ×
TeX - LaTeX Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for users of TeX, LaTeX, ConTeXt, and related typesetting systems. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm using cmake to compile a document. For a clean, built-from-scratch compile, this outputs around 1800 lines in my terminal. The Document.log file is just over 1000 lines long. Scrolling back over this output is a little tedious.

Is there a way to highlight bits of the output (such as errors, warnings, etc)? Neither pdflatex, latex or bibtex seem to have a --color option or similar mentioned in the man pages.

I can't find any references to doing this. Is the correct (or easiest) method to use a parser for the Document.log file the way this question does, rather than the terminal output?

share|improve this question
1  
You can look at the texloganalyser script that's present in TeX Live (and on CTAN, of course). –  egreg Jan 14 '13 at 11:26

1 Answer 1

I'm not sure if this exactly what you need, but with help of grep you can do something. Let's say I want to compile my tex file via terminal. pdflatex Untitled.tex does the job. However, I can pipe the output of this into grep and use color feature of grep to highlight a word (in this example "pdf")

pdflatex Untitled.tex | grep -E --color "pdf|$"

The result of this line is something like this:

enter image description here

You can easily do the same for the log file using following code:

grep --color -E "Missing|$" Untitled.log

In this case I'm highlighting the word "Missing" and of course you can do this for "error" or any other words:

enter image description here

What is done here, is simply piping the output (of the log file or pdflatex) to grep, highlighting a key word, and printing mismatched words as well (by the use of "$").

I'm not a cmake guy but if you can pipe it's our put to grep, it probably will work as well.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.