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I am looking for a substitute for the Times font we are using throughout our documents. This is how we load our fonts:

\usepackage{txfonts}
\renewcommand{\ttdefault}{cmtt}
\DeclareMathAlphabet{\mathtt}{OT1}{cmtt}{m}{n}
\SetMathAlphabet{\mathtt}{bold}{OT1}{cmtt}{b}{n}

(I know there's newtxfonts out by now, but that's not the issue here.)

The Linux Libertine font is an alternative which I could simply load using \usepackage{libertine}, but it's looking quite different from Times, and I'm not sure if this will be appreciated. Actually, I would prefer using the Liberation family, but so far I only found instructions that require the fontspec package, and hence the use of XeLaTeX/LuaLaTeX. At the current stage, I would prefer not to add this additional requirement so that all documents still can be compiled with pdflatex.

So: Is there a way to use the Liberation font family in a pdflatex environment? (EDIT: In other words, has anyone packaged this font already for pdflatex, and I missed that in my search?)

If not: I have found The Installation and Use of OpenType Fonts in LaTeX -- would this be the way to go to convert an OTF representation of Liberation for use with pdflatex? Which extra steps would be required to create an easy-to-use LaTeX package?

Also important for me, perhaps not worth a separate question: Can Liberation also be used as math font, or is there a math font that looks good in a Liberation document?

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You cannot use OpenType fonts natively unless you use XeTeX or LuaTeX (it's one of the main features of these systems actually) so yes, converting the font like in the link you found is actually the only possibility. –  Christian Feb 5 '13 at 10:19

1 Answer 1

The Liberation font has not been packaged for pdflatex, yet. So your options are either XeTeX/LuaTeX with the fontspec package, or to convert the font to Type 1 fonts yourself. The TUGboat article you linked to is a good description, but maybe you prefer Stephan Lehmkes's answer. This particularly uses True Type fonts, which is the format the Liberation fonts come in.

Concerning a fitting math font, I suggest to look at the newtxmath package, or mtpro2, whose lite version is free to use.

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