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I know there are many packages that offer the euro symbol (€). But which is the best implementation? I read something a couple of years ago [which I can't now find] that assessed the option. But even if I could find it, I imagine things might have changed since it was written. So: which package provides the best euro symbol (in terms of accuracy to the official specifications, in terms of looking good with the surrounding font and so on.) In response to Thorsten Donig's answer I should point out that these two desiderata seem in pretty much direct conflict if you're using a serif font.

The unicode symbol € doesn't work. (If you have a "compose key" it's "c=")

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I would very much question the need to follow the Official Specification, unless you are in the business of printing money. Use what goes well with your fonts. As per the officials the euro symbol was based on the Greek epsilon and the two parallel lines are supposed to certify the stability of the new euro. Given the current crisis of the euro and especially in Greece, I wouldn't give a penny's thought of not using the "standard euro"! These gentlemen also had other bright ideas - so that a modern Pericles is spelled "officially" as Periklis rather than the ancient Pericles! –  Yiannis Lazarides Jan 28 '11 at 19:05
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@Yiannis the official specification was just an example of one criterion on which implementations of the euro symbol could be judged. How is "Pericles" ancient? Greek doesn't really have a "c"... –  Seamus Jan 28 '11 at 19:48
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3 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

The unicode symbol € does work, if you use a modern font that contains that symbol. :-)

The best practice is to use right symbol for right font. For Computer Modern fonts, eurosym is OK, or textcomp (using fonts provided by CM-super). See this FAQ for more packages:

http://www.tex.ac.uk/cgi-bin/texfaq2html?label=euro

I suggest Latin Modern fonts (using lmodern together with textcomp package), which is similar to Computer Modern. So you can use:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc}
\usepackage{lmodern,textcomp}
\begin{document}
€100
\end{document}

There are still some other font packages with euro symbol. If you use such font themes, use the euro symbol provided by the font package. For example, libertine, fourier and mathdesign package. Thus you can also use:

\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[utf8x]{inputenc}
\usepackage{libertine} % or \usepackage{fourier} or \usepackage[utopia]{mathdesign}
\begin{document}
€100 % or \texteuro100
\end{document}

Using XeLaTeX, most modern OpenType/TrueType fonts have euro symbols, including default Latin Modern fonts. You can use them directly:

% xelatex
\documentclass{article}
\usepackage{fontspec}% Latin Modern by default
% or \setmainfont{Whatever you want}
\begin{document}
€100
\end{document}
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What's the difference between utf8 and utf8x for inputenc? –  Seamus Feb 4 '11 at 18:06
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@Seamus: utf8x option defines more symbols than utf8 option, while it may cause more compatible problems. –  Leo Liu Feb 4 '11 at 19:00
    
I've just tried that and with Libertine, it does work. However, it fails for many other fonts that do have an Euro glyph (e.g. OpenSans, via \usepackage[default]{opensans}). Why oh why? –  Damien Pollet Jan 19 '12 at 17:04
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The eurosym package is the one and only that translates the official specifications.

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Ya but it's kind of ugly –  Seamus Jan 28 '11 at 18:34
    
But if you want to do it right, there is no alternative. –  Thorsten Donig Jan 28 '11 at 18:36
    
@ThorstenDonig: That really depends on what your gauge for "right" is. If the designers of the official Euro symbol were intending for it to be used in all instances, regardless of the font used (which I'm not sure they did), I would probably decide not to let them tell me what's right, but rather conform to my own typographical opinion. –  doncherry Apr 10 '12 at 23:22
    
@doncherry: Designer of the official »Euro« currency symbol is the European Union. And this design does not depend on a font. The specifications of that symbol can be read in the package manual. The package authors simply made this official symbol available for LaTeX. It's up to you decide what form of Euro symbol you want to use. If you want the official version, this package is the way to go, or MarVoSym as alternative. I think there is no room for a "typographical opinion" in this case. –  Thorsten Donig Apr 12 '12 at 20:57
    
IMO, eurosym beats {lmodern,textcomp} hands down. eurosym is a nice crisp n sharp symbol, whereas {lmodern,textcomp} produces sth reminiscent of a symbol hit by a truck. –  nutty about natty Apr 17 '13 at 16:52
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\documentclass{article}
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
\usepackage[utf8]{inputenc}
\usepackage{textcomp}
\usepackage{eurosym}

\begin{document}

10€ and 10\euro

\let\texteuro\euro
10€ and 10\euro

\end{document} 

enter image description here

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