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I want to use a special ampersand in a document. I’m therefore looking for, and failing to find, a font that contains an ampersand that looks as follows:

specimen (That is, a slashed, rounded “E” letter.)

(For the record, this is the “Chalkduster” font, and it’s too casual for my use; I’m not searching for a script typeface.)

I distinctly remember having seen a sans serif typeface that featured such an ampersand but I am unable to find it again. For the record, Detexify doesn’t turn up anything either.

Either of two things would help me:

  1. Can somebody identify a commonly-available or freely available typeface that includes such an ampersand?
  2. Does anybody know how I could “draw” this character using LaTeX, in a way that would make it usable as a character?

(This is also an experiment: is such a question on-topic enough for the site? Feel free to state your opinion in the comments, and vote to close if you’re so inclined.)

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Perhaps you could make such a glyph on your own using fontforge –  pmav99 Jun 4 '11 at 13:34
    
While searching for just the right ampersand myself once, I found a pageful of them at hail2u.github.io/google-webfonts-ampersands.html (all open source fonts available from Google). Of all the slashed-E ampersands I see there, all are script-like fonts (not counting a few very blocky novelty-display fonts) and most do not have the full through-slash. The closest I see to what you describe is Yellowtail, though it is slanted and likely a bit too bold. –  Stonefeather Grubbs 12 hours ago
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1 Answer

Halvorsen (below)? You should probably ask at the typophile.com forums.

Halv

Edit how about Graphite? Casual, but not as casual as chalkduster?

graphite

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Close, but not quite – I’m really in love with the slash through the whole letter. The Halvorsen specimen looks more like a currency symbol than an ampersand. –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 28 '11 at 22:11
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