3
votes
2answers
298 views

Extract first letter of each word in a sentence

I don't know if already exists a question like this, but after 20 minutes I haven't found one. There are similar ones, like How to define a command that bolds the first letter of each word in the ...
1
vote
1answer
79 views

Kile, shortcut for most commonly used WORDS?

I'd like to know how to write a *.cwl file for Kile (the LaTeX editor for KDE Debian 7.3) with a list of shortcut words, that I use often such as bcc= because, e--= electrons, h0= holes and so forth. ...
17
votes
4answers
611 views

How to define a command that bolds the first letter of each word in the input argument?

I want to define a command that takes a sentence, a word or several words as input and bolds the first letter of each word. I need this mostly for abbreviations and so far I have done it manually in ...
8
votes
1answer
323 views

Acronyms without double dots using glossaries

I want to typeset my acronyms with abbreviating dots with, for instance, P.C.A. standing for principal component analysis and use macros for them. This question provides a trick to avoid double dots ...
2
votes
1answer
301 views

Template a Cover letter using macros?

I'd like to create a cover letter where I can insert the company name, and various other consistent pieces of information as a macro to be expanded when the document is compiled. I'm very new to ...
24
votes
3answers
485 views

Is it possible to define an acronym-command which behaves differently on the first invocation than on the rest?

Most technical writers will immediately see how I'd like to use this. I'm writing a paper about something I'll call That Which Will Be Abbreviated (TWWBA). I'd like to have a macro, \TWWBA{}, that ...
1
vote
0answers
297 views

Macros for et al, e.g., i.e., etc. [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Macros for common abbreviations Hi, Taking et al. as an example, is it possible to make a one-shot macro like \etal that can actually handle all possible cases where ...
34
votes
2answers
2k views

Macros for common abbreviations

Common abbreviations are surprisingly tricky to format correctly. I'd like some simple macros for them, to be used like so: You should eat more fruit, \eg apples, bananas, oranges, \etc. There are ...
6
votes
2answers
757 views

Macro for typesetting acronyms

All-caps acronyms and brand names like IBM look better when typeset a little smaller than usual. My simple solution is the following macro: \def\<#1>{{\small #1}} It's used like here ...