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3

There seems to be a bug in fontspec version 2.4a, when defining the Renderer key. The following works; code is like in fontspec-xetex.sty and 3 has been changed into 4, as Graphite is choice number 4. \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \ExplSyntaxOn \keys_define:nn {fontspec-renderer} { Renderer .choice_code:n = { \int_compare:nTF ...


1

This kind of problems generally comes from the fact that the LaTeX editor is not configured to the suitable input encoding. In this peculiar case (a XeLaTeX file, and XeTeX interpreting the input as UTF-8 by default), it means that the editor must be configured to UTF8-Unicode input encoding.


5

Maximum compatibility is impossible because \k is not provided in classical TeX in Computer Modern. Thus \k is undefined control sequence in plain TeX. The \k is defined depending on used macro package and used font encoding. LaTeX with default font encoding doesn't know the \k. Second problem: \"i gives dotted i and next pair of dots above (i.e. three ...


4

You can redefine \mathring to show an error message: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{MnSymbol} \usepackage{accents} \renewcommand{\mathring}[1]{% \PackageError{mysty}{Don't use \string\mathring!}{- more info -} } \begin{document} \title{TEST} \date{} \maketitle $\mathring{I}\mathring{J}\ring{I}$ \end{document} Obviously \PackageError is meant ...


4

\renewcommand\mathring[1]{\errmessage{DONT USE MATHRING}}


5

Use 1 or 2. You do not want to add groups around the letter unless you can avoid it (this is a major problem with bibtex's use of groups to control upper and lower casing). fine will typically use an fi ligature in most fonts but f{i}ne will break the ligature (usually). It is the same with letters with diacritics. If \"{i} is resolving to the use of the ...


1

Just to follow up the comments (and from curiosity), here's the same text in Noto Serif: \documentclass{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \setmainfont[Ligatures=TeX]{Noto Serif} \usepackage{polyglossia} \setmainlanguage{czech} \setotherlanguage{bulgarian} \begin{document} \textbulgarian{ || \textbf{\mbox{сп\`{о}р-ен}, -ни} \textit{прил.\,м.} || ...


0

I have spent a considerable amount of time to find why I suddenly get errors with TeXshop 2014 when mixing English, French and Romanian text. Romanian text was OK but French accents always gave errors. The reason was that I have put {inputenc} before {fontenc}. The following order ensures it works as expected and I can type French and Romanian accents ...


8

If you compile your document using a UTF-8 aware engine such as LuaTeX or XeTeX, the code works: % Compile with LuaLaTeX or XeLaTeX \documentclass[french]{article} \usepackage{fontspec} \usepackage{babel} \usepackage[]{qrcode} \begin{document} \qrcode[]{ààààççççééééùùùùïïï}% produces no error: accented characters \bigskip \qrcode[]{Are accented characters ...


3

Use the unicode character! With pdflatex you then have to add \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} and \usepackage[T1]{fontenc}, with lualatex or xetex \usepackage{fontspec}. Your source file has to be encoded like this of course. pdflatex \documentclass{article} \usepackage[utf8]{inputenc} \usepackage[T1]{fontenc} \begin{document} Sankhyā \end{document} ...



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